UWM Home PageUWM Graduate School UWM logo Grad School graphic
Quick Links


Prospective Students



Contact Information

Phone: (414) 229-4851
Fax: (414) 229-5311

Request Information

Social Work

School/College: Helen Bader School of Social Welfare

Degrees Conferred:

  • Master of Social Work ( MSW)
  • Ph.D. in Social Work

Contents

Related Certificates
State of Wisconsin Credentials

Overview

The Helen Bader School of Social Welfare (HBSSW) offers a program of graduate studies in social work. As a department in an urban research university, the mission of the Department of Social Work is to promote positive change through social work research, scholarship, education, and community partnerships. The Department promotes the values of the social work profession through a commitment to social justice and diversity, a dedication to public service, and an emphasis on individual and community well-being. The goal of the MSW program is to prepare graduates with specialized knowledge and skills for advanced practice and leadership with diverse populations and communities.

In furtherance of its mission, the goals of the Social Work Department are:

  1. To educate students to become highly skilled, culturally competent, and ethical social workers and to provide leadership for the practice of social justice.
  2. To create and disseminate knowledge leading to social work and inter-disciplinary innovations.
  3. To engage in research and apply results that inform social work policy, practice, advocacy, education, and future research.
  4. To collaborate with community partners in promoting evidence-informed practice, educational and research partnerships, and social and economic justice.

HBSSW offers students access to the University computer system, special interview training rooms, and specialized audiovisual materials.

Master in Social Work ( MSW)

The MSW curriculum is designed to prepare students for advanced-level professional Social Work practice, and builds upon a solid base of coursework in human behavior, practice methods, research, and policy. The MSW program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and can prepare students for state certification requirements.

Specializations

Upon completion of the Professional Foundation requirements—through coursework or exemption—students enter into the Advanced Curriculum and choose one of three specialized concentrations: Physical, Behavioral, and Mental Health; Gerontology; or Child and Family Welfare. Additionally, students choose one of three practice method areas: Direct Practice, Macro Practice, and Double Methods. With careful faculty advising, students are able to develop a course of study that builds upon their individualized interests, experiences, and strengths.

Concentration Areas

Physical, Behavioral, and Mental Health
The behavioral and physical health concentration is designed to prepare students for advanced social work practice involving the delivery of health, mental health, and addictions services to individuals, families, small groups, and the community. Students are exposed to issues, approaches, and technologies for application in prevention, treatment, administration, and policy. These are related to risks and problems with: alcohol and other drugs, mental health and mental illness, intimate partner violence, community violence, cognitive and physical disabilities, physical illness, and other behavioral health concerns across the lifespan. Coursework provides students with knowledge, values, and skills to prepare them for professional practice in a variety of private and public settings related to physical health, mental health, addictions, and substance abuse.

Gerontology
The concentration in gerontology is designed to aid students in understanding the complexity of the aging process from the perspective of the individual, family, society, and social policy. The concentration will cover the physical, psychological, and social processes of aging—including family roles and responsibilities, cultural diversity, social support networks, and the use of health and social services. Major developmental issues during the second half of life will be presented and interventions to facilitate adaptation to developmental change will be described. Coursework will enable students to: understand late-life mental disorders; develop assessment skills; formulate, implement, and evaluate treatment plans; and, become aware of issues related to age and ageism as they influence social work practice.

Child and Family Welfare
The social work profession has a long history of commitment to ensuring the welfare of children. Furthermore, professionals recognize the family system as being significant in the lives of children. The family system, in its various forms, represents a significant social institution, essential to communities and to society as a whole. This concentration focuses on the study of family systems, child and family welfare, and interventions to enhance the lives of children and families. Students in this concentration develop the advanced practice knowledge and skills necessary to provide services to children and families in a wide variety of settings.

Practice Method Areas

Direct Practice
By providing advanced-level knowledge and skills to address the changing impact of interpersonal and social problems, this specialty prepares students who are interested in using direct practice to help individuals, families, and groups.

Macro Practice
This method is for students who are interested in planned change with organizations and communities. Students will prepare for roles in planning, policy, administration, program development and community practice.

Double Methods
Students who are interested in gaining knowledge and skills relevant to both Direct Practice and Macro Practice techniques and settings may choose a “Double Methods” sequence. This combination of methods tracks may require up to an additional semester of coursework. Four semesters of Field Placement are required with two semesters of Direct Practice experience and two semesters of Macro Practice experience. Students who have interests that range from direct social work practice to more administrative social work roles will benefit from this option.

Master of Arts in Women’s Studies / Master of Social Work coordinated degree program

The College of Letters and Science and the Helen Bader School of Social Welfare collaboratively offer a coordinated program designed to provide students with theoretical and practical exposure to evolving professional practice and the field of feminist research and scholarship. Prerequisite to the award of either degree in this program is the simultaneous award of its counterpart degree.

Doctoral Program

The goals and objectives of the doctoral program reflect the Department's concern with urban social problems, social and economic equity and well-being, cultural diversity, and the empowerment of individuals, families, organizations, and communities to effect change. The program will prepare students to make significant contributions to social work education and the knowledge base of the profession.

The program emphasizes three areas of specialization: Addiction and Behavioral Health, Applied Gerontology, and Family and Child Welfare.

Graduate Faculty

Go back to the top

Professors
Kadushin, Goldie, Ph.D., University of Illinois-Chicago
McMurtry, Steven, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Rose, Susan, Ph.D., University of Illinois-Chicago
Associate Professors
Berger, Lisa, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Brondino, Michael, Ph.D., University of South Carolina-Columbia
Kwak, Jung, Ph.D. University of South Florida
Lie, Gwat-Yong, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Otto-Salaj, Laura, Ph.D., Temple University
Padgett, Deborah, Ph.D., Washington University, Chair
Pate, David, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Topitzes, James (Dimitri), Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Assistant Professors
Blakey, Joan Ph.D. University of Chicago
Kavanaugh, Melinda Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison
Rolock, Nancy Ph.D. University of Illinois-Chicago
Williams, Mark, Ph.D. University of Washington

Master of Social Work

Go back to the top

Admission

Application must be made to both the Graduate School and HBSSW. Program application materials are available for the Fall semester only. All applications must be completed and submitted on or before January 2. Applicants must meet Graduate School and program requirements for admission, including:

  1. Undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 or better.
  2. Completion of at least 21 semester credits in the social and behavioral sciences (i.e., psychology, sociology, political science, economics, anthropology, and/or their equivalents).
  3. Submission of a program application which includes three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant's personal and professional background and potential for success in the social work profession, as well as a narrative statement, providing information about relevant volunteer and work experiences and professional goals. (See program application forms for additional information.)

Applicants may be admitted with specific program-defined course deficiencies provided that these deficiencies include no more than the satisfactory completion of two courses. Deficiency requirements must be satisfied within one semester of enrollment in the Advanced Curriculum. Deficiencies are monitored by the Graduate School and HBSSW. Course credits acquired by satisfying deficiencies are not counted as program credits required for the degree.

Faculty Advisor

All students must have a faculty member within their area of specialized concentration to advise and supervise their studies as specified in Graduate School regulations. Students must develop, in consultation with the advisor, a written plan of study, including selection of the specialized concentration and practice method areas. Students who are not assigned an advisor at the time of their admission should contact the Assistant Dean of HBSSW for assignment. Students may elect to change advisor contingent upon the new advisor's appropriateness to the area of specialized concentration, the advisor's acceptance of additional advisees, and formal notification to the office of the Assistant Dean of HBSSW.

Non-degree Students

UWM non-degree students may earn credits which, if appropriate, may be counted toward a degree at a later date. Non-degree students may enroll in 12 credits of the Professional Foundation courses with the exception of field education (721), and in courses for 12 credits of which prerequisites can be satisfied. Non-degree students may not enroll in field education or advanced curriculum practice methods courses (711, 713, 721, 722, 811, 820, 821, 822, 915). Students should contact the Graduate School for information and regulations on non-degree status as well as the HBSSW advising office prior to enrolling for social work courses under the non-degree classification.

Credits and Courses

The MSW program requires a minimum of 34 graduate credits for students admitted to the Advanced Curriculum. Students may be required to complete up to 22 credits to fulfill the Professional Foundation. Course work taken as the Professional Foundation (see below) cannot be counted as part of the 34 Advanced Curriculum credits. The minimum 34 Advanced Curriculum credit requirements are distributed as follows:

11 credits of Field Instruction (722/821/822)
8 credits of Social Work Practice Methods (711, 811*, and additional practice course) or (713, 915, and additional practice course)
4 credits of Social Work Research (793/794)
5 credits within selected area of concentration (851* and one of 685, 753, or 771, depending on area of concentration)
6 credits of electives

* Requires sections to be selected from within the specialized concentration area

The capstone requirement is satisfied by Soc Wrk 822 (Field Instruction IV).

Professional Foundation

Students admitted into the graduate social work program without having earned a bachelor's degree from an accredited social work program within the past 5 years are required to fulfill the Professional Foundation prior to Advanced Curriculum course work (see below for exemptions). The purpose of the Professional Foundation is to orient students to the profession and to provide a knowledge, values and skills base in preparation for the Advanced Curriculum. Course work in the Professional Foundation is not included in the 34 Advanced Curriculum credits required for completion of the MSW degree. The Professional Foundation courses are:

604 Social Systems and Social Work Practice
662 Methods of Social Welfare Research
665 Cultural Diversity and Social Work
705 Individual Behavior and Social Welfare
708 Social Work Methodology I
709 Social Work Methodology II
721 Field Instruction I
750 Social Welfare Policy Development and Implementation
Exemptions

Students who have, within the 5 years preceding admission, completed course work which substantially duplicates Professional Foundation courses may apply to the Chair of the Social Work Department for an exemption from the relevant courses. Exemption examinations are also offered on a scheduled basis for these courses. Exemption of the field experience (721) may be permitted under special employment experience circumstances and only by permission of the Director of Field Programs. Students interested in securing an exemption should request course exemption forms upon notification of admission to the program.

All requests for exemptions must be made at the time of initial enrollment. Exemption requests will not be accepted following the end of the first semester of coursework.

Time Limit

Students admitted directly into the Advanced Curriculum must complete all degree requirements within seven years of initial enrollment; students required to complete any portion of the Professional Foundation must complete all degree requirements within seven years of initial enrollment.

Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work

For students who began the program before Fall 2015

Go back to the top

Admission

Relevant application materials must be submitted to both the Graduate School and HBSSW and will be accepted for admission in the Fall semester only. All applications must be completed and submitted on or before January 2. Applications received after January 2 will be considered only if space is available after other applications are reviewed. Applicants must meet Graduate School requirements plus the following departmental requirements in order to be considered:

  1. Hold or be in the process of completing a master’s degree in social work.
  2. Identify the following in the Personal Statement section of the Graduate School application:
    • Which of the program's three areas of specialization (Addiction and Behavioral Health, Applied Gerontology, or Family and Child Welfare) they wish to pursue.
    • Their reasons for seeking a doctoral degree in social work.
    • Their goals as future scholars.
    • A topic or issue in the field that they consider to be particularly challenging and worthy of study.
  3. Submit a current copy of a professional résumé or curriculum vitae to the Social Work Ph.D. Program. This should contain information on:
    • All post-secondary education, including institutions, degrees and dates of completed programs of study, plus institutions, dates, and types of study that did not lead to a degree.
    • All employment by the applicant in social work and related areas, including dates and employing organizations.
    • Employment unrelated to social work within the past five years.
    • Information on any past or current professional licenses held.
  4. Submit scores from within the past five years on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test to the Social Work Ph.D. Program.
  5. Submit three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant’s achievements and academic potential, including at least one current or former graduate program instructor to the Social Work Ph.D. Program.
  6. Submit a sample of written work to the Social Work Ph.D. Program that demonstrates: the applicant’s knowledge of social work theory, practice, and research; ability to think analytically; and writing skills. The sample should be at least 1000 words in length and represent work for which the applicant was the sole author.

The department will assign each Ph.D. student a major professor. This assignment is based on congruence between the applicant’s interests and the expertise of the major professor. In consultation with the director of the Ph.D. program, the student may change major professors after beginning the program, but no applicant will be admitted unless a doctoral faculty member in social work agrees to serve as major professor.

Financial Assistance

Through a combination of tuition remission, teaching assistantships, research assistantships, fellowships, and other options, the program will attempt to provide financial assistance to all admitted students during their first three years in the program. Applicants needing additional information on other sources of financial assistance, such as student loans, should contact the campus Department of Financial Aid.

Residence

Students must meet minimum Graduate School residency requirements.

Course of Study

A minimum degree of 43 graduate credits beyond the master’s degree are required, at least 36 of which must be earned in residence at UWM.

In consultation with the major professor and as soon as possible after admission, each student designs a program of study to gain the knowledge and skills appropriate to his/ her educational goals. All programs of study must include the following:

Knowledge Building (3 credits)
Required Course
SocWrk 901 - History and Philosophy of Scientific Inquiry
Specialization Seminars (11-12 credits)

The curriculum includes three areas of specialization: Addiction and Behavioral Health, Applied Gerontology, and Family and Child Welfare. Each student must select at least one of these areas in which to concentrate. In consultation with the major professor, a student may also choose to develop expertise that spans more than one area.

Content in these three specialization areas is presented in the form of specialization seminars. All students must take at least three specialization seminars within the department and at least one relevant course external to the department; the external course must be from a list of courses approved for this purpose or a student’s unique request approved by the doctoral program committee. At least two courses, including one internal and one external course, must be in the student’s area of specialization, and at least one course internal to the department must be in an area other than the student’s primary specialization. All specialization courses outside the department must be approved by the student’s major professor prior to enrollment.

Examples of specialization seminars
SocWrk 931 - Theories of Poverty and Social Welfare Policy for Children and Families (Family and Child Welfare specialization)
SocWrk 932 -Research and Processes of Individual Change across the Lifespan (Addiction and Behavioral Health specialization)
SocWrk 945 - Family and Long-Term Care Across the Life Course (Applied Gerontology specialization)
Methods of Inquiry and Analysis (19 credits total)

Content in this area comprises a set of required courses in methods of social/behavioral research and statistics. Students are expected to enter the program with at least a basic background in both methods and statistics and may need to satisfy prerequisites before proceeding to required courses.

Research Methods
Required Courses
SocWrk 951 - Quantitative Research Methods
SocWrk 952 - Qualitative Research Methods
Statistics
Required Courses
SocWrk 961 – Introduction to Statistical Methods
SocWrk 962 – Applied Multiple Regression Analysis
SocWrk 963 – Measurement Methods and Related Multivariate Statistics
SocWrk 964 – Advanced Statistical Methods

In cases where any of the above courses are not available during the student’s course of study, students may choose from an approved set of alternatives offered in other departments or campuses. Approval for such an exception must be secured from the major advisor prior to enrolling.

Requirements in this area are designed to provide students with specialized knowledge and skills needed for success in scholarly endeavors and teaching at the post-secondary level. With respect to classroom work, all students must complete the following three one-credit proseminars:

SocWrk 991 -Topics in Social Work: Proseminar in Research Ethics
SocWrk 991 -Topic in Social Work: Proseminar in Grantwriting
GRAD 803 – Teaching and Learning in College

Additionally, all students must complete one semester of work as a teaching assistant and one semester as a project or research assistant, usually in their second year. During the semester in which they serve as a teaching assistant, students must enroll for one credit in:

SocWrk 999 – Independent Study. This independent study credit will be completed under the supervision of the faculty member to whom the student is assigned as an assistant. The product should be a project that will advance the student’s skills in teaching, such as preparation of a guest lecture or other such task determined by the supervising faculty member.

Electives (4-6 credits)

These credits provide an opportunity for students to take content of interest within the social work department or in other departments on campus that offer graduate-level courses relevant to the student’s educational goals. Elective options within the department include the completion of additional specialization seminars beyond the required total. Students may also complete this requirement by taking additional research methods or statistics courses within or outside the department, or they may take theory or basic-knowledge courses in other departments that are at the graduate level and are approved by their advisor and the social work Ph.D. program coordinator.

Preliminary Examination

All students must pass a preliminary examination subsequent to successfully completing all required course work and prior to being admitted to doctoral candidacy (see http://graduateschool.uwm.edu/students/current/doctoral/). The examination assesses students’ ability to articulate their research interests, analyze and synthesize empirical knowledge and relevant theoretical concepts, explain how theory may affect the generation of knowledge, and show familiarity with relevant scientific methodologies. In keeping with Graduate School rules, the preliminary examination should be completed within five years of enrollment.

An Application for the Doctoral Preliminary Examination (http://www.graduateschool.uwm.edu/students/current/doctoral/) must be completed by the student and signed and submitted to the Ph.D. Program Committee by the major professor six weeks prior to the first examination. Students who fail the preliminary examination may not proceed to the dissertation. The exam may be retaken only once. Complete policies regarding forming a preliminary examination committee, writing the proposal, and taking the examination
are available in the Social Work Ph.D. program handbook.

Dissertation Proposal Defense

All students must successfully complete an oral defense of their dissertation proposal to determine their preparation for independent research. The defense must be completed successfully within four years of initial enrollment.

Dissertation

Students who have passed the Preliminary Examination and have submitted a one-page preliminary dissertation proposal are formally admitted to doctoral candidacy. In accordance with Graduate School policies, students must then register for three research or thesis/dissertation credits each semester until the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School. To meet the requirements for the dissertation, the candidate must complete an original independent research project that adds meaningfully to the existing body of knowledge in social work. It should be of a caliber that warrants publication in respected journals in the field.

Dissertation Defense

As the final step toward the degree, the candidate must pass an oral examination before his/her doctoral committee in defense of the dissertation. The examination may also cover general topics relevant to the student’s area of study. This requirement may not be completed until all other degree requirements are satisfied.

Time Limit

It is expected that most students will complete all degree requirements within six years of initial enrollment in the doctoral program. All requirements MUST be completed within ten years from the date of initial enrollment.

Joint Master of Social Work and Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work

For students who began the program before Fall 2015

Go back to the top

Admission

Relevant application materials must be submitted to both the Graduate School and HBSSW and will be accepted for admission in the Fall semester only. All applications must be completed and submitted on or before January 2. Applications received after January 2 will be considered only if space is available after other applications are reviewed.

Students who apply and are accepted to the joint MSW/Ph.D. program will be able to earn both degrees in the course of their studies and will not be required to apply to the Ph.D. program after earning the MSW degree, assuming their progress is satisfactory. Applicants who are not offered admission to the joint program will still be considered for admission into the MSW-only program.

All applicants must meet Graduate School requirements plus the following departmental requirements:

  1. Have an undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 or better.
  2. Have completed at least 21 semester credits in the social and behavioral sciences (i.e., psychology, sociology, political science, economics, anthropology, and/or their equivalents).
  3. Indicate the following In the Personal Statement section of the Graduate School application form:
    • Which of the program's three areas of specialization (Addiction and Behavioral Health, Applied Gerontology, or Family and Child Welfare) they wish to pursue.
    • Their reasons for seeking a doctoral degree in social work.
    • Their goals as future scholars.
    • A topic or issue in the field that they consider to be particularly challenging and worthy of study.
  4. In materials submitted to the Department of Social Work, applicants must:
    • Provide a current copy of a professional résumé or curriculum vitae. This should contain information on:
      • All post-secondary education, including institutions, degrees and dates of completed programs of study, plus institutions, dates, and types of study that did not lead to a degree.
      • All employment by the applicant in social work and related areas, including dates and employing organizations.
      • Employment unrelated to social work within the past five years.
      • Information on any past or current professional licenses held.
  5. Submit scores from within the past five years on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test.
  6. Submit three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant's achievements and academic potential, including at least one current or former academic instructor.
  7. Submit a sample of written work that demonstrates: the applicant's knowledge of social work theory, practice, and research; ability to think analytically; and writing skills. The sample should be at least 1000 words in length and represent work for which the applicant was the sole author, or if it is jointly authored should indicate which sections were primarily done by the applicant.
Advisement

The department will assign each MSW/Ph.D student a major professor. This assignment is based on congruence between the applicant's interests and the expertise of the major professor. In consultation with the director of the Ph.D. program, the student may change major professors after beginning the program, but no applicant will be admitted unless a doctoral faculty member in social work agrees to serve as major professor.

Financial Assistance

Through a combination of tuition remission, teaching assistantships, research assistantships, fellowships, and other options, the program will attempt to provide financial assistance to all admitted students during their first four years in the program. Applicants needing additional information on other sources of financial assistance, such as student loans, should contact the campus Department of Financial Aid.

Residence

Students must meet minimum Graduate School residency requirements.

Course of Study
MSW Requirements

The MSW portion of the joint curriculum requires a minimum of 22 graduate credits for students admitted to the Advanced Curriculum. Another 12 credits normally required in the Advanced Curriculum will be replaced by the same number of Ph.D- level credits. Students admitted into the joint curriculum who have not earned a bachelor's degree from an accredited social work program within the past five years are required to complete 22 credits in the Professional Foundation prior to beginning courses in the Advanced Curriculum. The purpose of the Professional Foundation is to orient students to the profession and to provide a knowledge, values and skills base for later course. Credits in the Professional Foundation are not included in the 22 Advanced Curriculum credits required for completion of the MSW degree, nor do they apply to the required 12 Ph.D-level credits.

Courses in the Professional Foundation are:
SocWrk 604 Social Systems and Social Work Practice (3 cr.)
SocWrk 662 Methods of Social Welfare Research (3 cr.)
SocWrk 665 Cultural Diversity and Social Work (3 cr.)
SocWrk 705 Individual Behavior and Social Welfare (3 cr.)
SocWrk 708 Social Work Methodology I (3 cr.)
SocWrk 709 Social Work Methodology II (2 cr.)
SocWrk 721 Field Instruction I (3 cr.)
SocWrk 750 Social Welfare Policy Development and Implementation (2 cr.)

MSW-level courses to be taken in the Advanced Curriculum are:
SocWrk 711 Direct SW Prac. OR SocWrk 713 Community Organization, Planning and Human Service Administration I (3 cr.)
SocWrk 722 Field Instruction II (3 cr.)
SocWrk 753 Psychopathology (3 cr.)
SocWrk 811 Direct Social Work Practice II (3 cr.)
SocWrk 820 Seminar in Social Work Practice (2 cr.)
SocWrk 821 Field Instruction III (4 cr.)
SocWrk 822 Field Instruction IV (4 cr.)

MSW courses in the Advanced Curriculum to be replaced by Ph.D.-level courses are:
SocWrk 793 Adv. Mthds. of Soc. Wlf. Rsch. (2 cr.) replaced by 961 (description below)
SocWrk 794 Eval. Soc. Wlf. Prgms. (2 cr.) replaced by 951 or 952 (descriptions below)
SocWrk 851 Soc. Issue & Pol. Anal. (2 cr.) replaced by 931 or 945 (descriptions below)
SocWrk 791 Elective (3 cr.) replaced by 901 or 932 (descriptions below)
SocWrk 791 Elective (3 cr.) replaced by 963 or doctoral elective (descriptions below)

Exemptions

Students who have, within the 5 years preceding admission, completed course work which substantially duplicates MSW Professional Foundation courses may apply to the Chair of the Social Work Department for an exemption from the relevant courses. Exemption examinations are also offered on a scheduled basis for these courses. Exemption of the field experience (721) may be authorized by the Director of Field Programs for students having sufficient supervised employment experience. Students interested in securing an exemption should request course exemption forms upon notification of admission to the program.

All requests for exemptions must be made at the time of initial enrollment. Exemption requests will not be accepted following the end of the first semester of coursework.

Ph.D. Requirements

A minimum of 39 credits of Ph.D.-level course work is required. At least 33 of these must be earned in residence at UWM. Required courses include:

Foundation (3 credits required)
SocWrk 901 Philosophy of Science (3 cr.)

Specialization Seminars (9 credits required, three from student's area of specialization)
Examples of currently available seminars are:
SocWrk 931 Theories of Poverty and Soc. Welf. Policy for Children and Fams. (3 cr.)
SocWrk 932 Research and Processes of Individual Change across the Lifespan (3 cr.)
SocWrk 945 Family and Long-Term Care Across the Life Course (3 cr.)

Research Methods (6 credits required)
SocWrk 951 Quantitative Research Methods (3 cr.)
SocWrk 952 Qualitative Research Methods (3 cr.)

Statistics (13 credits required)
SocWrk 961 Introduction to Statistical Methods (4 cr.)
SocWrk 962 Applied Multiple Regression Analysis (3 cr.)
SocWrk 963 Measurement Methods and Related Multivariate Statistics (3 cr.)
SocWrk 964 Advanced Statistical Methods (3 cr.)

Proseminars and Independent Study (4 credits)
SocWrk 991 Topics in Social Work: Proseminar in Research Ethics (1 cr.)
SocWrk 991 Topic in Social Work: Proseminar in Grantwriting (1 cr.)
GRAD 803 Teaching and Learning in College (1 cr.)
SocWrk 999 Independent Reading in Social Work (1 cr.)

Electives (4-6 credits)
Two approved external doctoral-level courses in area of specialization (2-3 cr. each)
Preliminary Examination

All students must pass a preliminary examination subsequent to successfully completing all required course work and prior to being admitted to doctoral candidacy (see www.graduateschool.uwm.edu/students/current/doctoral/). The examination assesses students’ ability to articulate their research interests, analyze and synthesize empirical knowledge and relevant theoretical concepts, explain how theory may affect the generation of knowledge, and show familiarity with relevant scientific methodologies. In keeping with Graduate School rules, the preliminary examination should be completed within five years of enrollment.

An Application for the Doctoral Preliminary Examination (www.graduateschool.uwm.edu/students/current/doctoral/) must be completed by the student and signed and submitted to the Ph.D. Program Committee by the major professor six weeks prior to the first examination. Students who fail the preliminary examination may not proceed to the dissertation. The exam may be retaken only once. Complete policies regarding forming a preliminary examination committee, writing the proposal, and taking the examination are available in the Social Work Ph.D. program handbook.

Dissertation Proposal Defense

All students must successfully complete an oral defense of their dissertation proposal to determine their preparation for independent research. The defense must be completed successfully within four years of initial enrollment.

Dissertation

Students who have passed the Preliminary Examination and have submitted a one-page preliminary dissertation proposal are formally admitted to doctoral candidacy. In accordance with Graduate School policies, students must then register for three research or thesis/dissertation credits each semester until the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School. To meet the requirements for the dissertation, the candidate must complete an original independent research project that adds meaningfully to the existing body of knowledge in social work. It should be of a caliber that warrants publication in respected journals in the field.

Dissertation Defense

As the final step toward the degree, the candidate must pass an oral examination before his/her doctoral committee in defense of the dissertation. The examination may also cover general topics relevant to the student's area of study. This requirement may not be completed until all other degree requirements are satisfied.

Time Limit

It is expected that most students will complete all degree requirements within seven years of initial enrollment in the joint M.S.W./Ph.D. program. All requirements MUST be completed within ten years from the date of initial enrollment.

State of Wisconsin Credentials

Go back to the top

The MSW Program prepares graduates to qualify for the Certified Advanced Practice Social Worker (CAPSW) credential granted by the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services (DSPS). Additionally, by choosing specific coursework in close collaboration with an advisor, a student can meet the educational requirements for these other State of Wisconsin-granted credentials:

  1. School Social Work certification granted by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI).
  2. Substance Abuse Counselor (SAC) certification granted by the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services.
  3. Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) credential granted by the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services.

It is important to note that each of these credentials has different requirements, some of which go beyond the educational component that can be satisfied by the specific MSW program coursework. For instance, candidates for such credentials may have to take state and national competency exams, provide proof of post-degree supervised practice experience, or create a portfolio for submission to the state. Please see the Web sites of the above State of Wisconsin departments for further information about the particular requirements for each.

Courses

Go back to the top

Courses numbered 300-699 are Undergraduate/Graduate. Courses numbered 700 and above are Graduate only.

497 Study Abroad: (Subtitled). 1-6 cr. U/G.
Variable content (subtitle is area of concentration). Designed to enroll students in UWM sponsored program before course work level, content and credits are determined and/or in specially prepared program course work. Retakeable with change in topic to max of 9 cr. Prereq: jr st; acceptance for Study Abroad Prog.
562 Child and Family Services. 2 cr. U/G.
Introduction to child and family welfare services, including methods for assessing needs, existing treatment techniques, and institutional support systems. Prereq: jr st, satisfy English competency, one prior course in Soc Wrk recom; or grad st.
564 Social Services for the Aging. 2 cr. U/G.
Individual and societal implications of the aging process, with an emphasis upon current resources and programs for the elderly. Prereq: jr st, satisfy English competency, one prior course in Soc Wrk recom; or grad st.
580 An Overview of Child/Youth Care. 3 cr. U/G.
Survey of skills, theories and approaches of the youth work field. Emphasis on relationship-building, interactive and developmental approaches in a variety of settings. Ed Pol/ExcEduc/Soc Wrk 580 are jointly offered & count as repeats of each other. Prereq: jr st or cons instr.
581 Youth Work Practice. 3 cr. U/G.
Applies the skills, theories and approaches of the youth work field to settings such as schools, community centers, and residential programs. Ed Pol/ExcEduc/Soc Wrk 581 are jointly offered & count as repeats of each other. Prereq: jr st; Ed Pol/ExcEduc/Soc Wrk 580(P); or grad st or cons instr.
604 Social Systems and Social Work Practice. 3 cr. U/G.
Analysis of organizations, community and social institutions and the impact they have on human behavior and how they provide the social context of social work practice. Prereq: jr st; satisfy English competency, admis to Soc Wrk major, Soc Wrk 310(P); or grad st.
630 Families and Poverty. 2-3 cr. U/G.
Description of families in poverty and analysis of historical and contemporary national and state policies aimed at reducing poverty. Prereq: jr st; one prior course in Soc Wrk recom.
650 Social Welfare and the Law. 2 cr. U/G.
Collaborative principles of social work and the legal profession. Selected concepts and principles of legal and social provision for protection of family, children and adults. Prereq: jr st, satisfy English competency, one prior course in Soc Wrk recom; or grad st.
662 Methods of Social Welfare Research. 3 cr. U/G.
Analyze methods of social welfare research and problems in project design and programming. Characteristics of investigations directed to planning, administrative, practice, and scientific objectives. Prereq: jr st, Soc Wrk major, completion of GER Math req, Soc Wrk 100(P) & 206(P), 421(C); or grad st.
665 Cultural Diversity and Social Work. 3 cr. U/G.
Emphasis on culture, race and ethnicity, theories of prejudice, and racial minority groups, and the politics of human services in multicultural society. Prereq: jr st, admis to Soc Wrk major, satisfy English competency, Soc Wrk 100(P), 206(P), 250(350)(P); or grad st.
685 Social Gerontology. 3 cr. U/G.
Exploration of individual aging experiences and interaction with social structures and social systems. Counts as repeat of Soc Wrk 591 & 791 with the same topic. Prereq: jr st and one prior course in Soc Wrk recom; or grad st.
691 Practice Methods in Social Work: (Subtitled). 1-3 cr. U/G.
Topics focused on Social Work practice methods. Specific topics and credits to be announced in Schedule of Classes. May be retaken with change in topic to max of 6 cr. Prereq: jr st.
705 Individual Behavior and Social Welfare. 3 cr. G.
The development and behavior of individuals in interaction with their social contexts; implications for social welfare. Prereq: grad st.
708 Social Work Methods I: Individuals and Families. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to generalist social work practice with individuals and families, with emphasis on integration of theory and knowledge with professional practice. Prereq: grad st; admis to MSW
709 Social Work Methods II: Groups, Organizations and Communities. 2 cr. G.
Introduction to generalist social work practice with groups, organizations and communities, with emphasis on integration of theory and knowledge with professional practice. Prereq: grad st; admis to MSW; Soc Wrk 708(C)
711 Direct Social Work Practice I. 3 cr. G.
Methods of social work intervention employed in helping individuals, families and small groups. Addresses personal, interpersonal, environmental and resource issues with emphasis on interviewing, assessing, contracting and goal setting. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 710(P), or BSW degree, or Soc Wrk 708(P) & 709(P); Soc Wrk 722(C).
713 Community Organization, Planning and Human Service Administration I. 3 cr. G.
Knowledge and skill development in the activities, roles, styles, and ethical issues in community and administrative practice. Emphasis on needs assessment, planning methodologies, and change efforts. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 708 & 709(710) or BSW degree.
718 Introduction to SAS Programming. 3 cr. G.
Fundamental instruction in programming, data management and exploratory data analysis using SAS software. Prereq: grad st
719 Advanced SAS Programming. 3 cr. G.
Advanced instruction in programming, data management, and exploratory data analysis using SAS software. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 718(P) or cons instr
721 Field Instruction I. 3 cr. G.
Supervised social work practice in a social agency. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 710(P) or 708(P); 709(C) or 711(C).
722 Field Instruction II. 3 cr. G.
Supervised social work practice in a social agency. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 721(P) or BSW degree; Soc Wrk 713(C) or 711(C).
750 Social Welfare Policy Development and Implementation. 2 cr. G.
Examination of policy development, implementation, and models of analysis that describe and provide analytical guides for determining the efficacy of public policy in addressing human needs. Prereq: grad st.
753 Adult Psychopathology. 3 cr. G.
Mental disorders and their implications for the social work profession, including assessment, intervention and prevention issues. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 705(P).
754 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. 2 cr. G.
Mental and behavioral disorders of children and adolescents and their implications for the social work profession, including assessment, intervention and prevention issues. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 705.
765 Social Work Boundaries and Ethics in Professional Practice. 2-3 cr. G.
Ethical issues faced by social work practitioners in professional practice. Topics include NASW Code of Ethics, boundary issues, ethical dilemmas, and risk management. Prereq: grad st.
771 Development of the Family Over the Life Span. 3 cr. G.
The family as a social system as it engages in various developmental tasks throughout the life cycle and in interaction with the social context; social work implications of relevant theories and research. Prereq: grad st.
774 Trauma Counseling I: Theory and Research. 3 cr. G.
Seminar examining impact of trauma experience on individuals, groups and communities following a catastrophic event. Explores traumatic events, mental injuries and impact on memory, learning, physical health and dysfunctional behavior. Couns 774, Nurs 774, OccThpy 774, and Soc Wrk 774 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st
775 Trauma Counseling II: Diagnosis and Treatment. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on diagnosis and assessment instruments as well as intervention and therapeutic techniques used to address trauma issues in counseling acute and chronic traumatized clients. Couns 775, Nurs 775, OccThpy 775, and Soc Wrk 775 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st; Couns 774, Nurs 774, OccThpy 774, or Soc Wrk 774(P), or cons instr
791 Current Topics in Social Work: (Subtitled). 1-3 cr. G.
Variable content course with specific topics to be announced in schedule of classes. May be repeated with change in topic to max of 6 cr. Prereq: grad st.
793 Evaluation of Practice. 2 cr. G.
Advanced problems and methods of research in social work practice. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 662(P) or equiv; Soc Wrk 721(C) or 722(C).
794 Evaluation of Programs. 2 cr. G.
Provides students with the skills and knowledge base necessary to understand the program evaluation process as it applies to social welfare programs. Prereq: grad st.
811 Direct Social Work Practice II: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
A continuation of methods of social work intervention, with sections tailored to specialized concentration areas: gerontology, family and child welfare, and behavioral and physical health. Emphasis is on selection and implementation of appropriate intervention plans. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 711(P); 722(C).
813 Financial Management and Planning in Human Services. 2 cr. G.
This course is designed to facilitate and understanding of selected areas of planning and management in human services with an emphasis on resource development and financial management. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 713(C) & 915(C) or cons reg; cons instr.
819 Social and Environmental Justice in Public Health. 3 cr. G.
Social and environmental justice perspective on public health problems and concerns. Jointly offered w/ & counts as a repeat of PH 819. Prereq: grad st.
820 Seminar in Social Work Practice: (Subtitled). 2 cr. G.
Critical examination of varied and specialized methodologies with emphasis on new professional directions, interdisciplinary coordination and integration of professional practice with behavioral sciences, research, and policy concerns. May be repeated with change in topic to max of 6 cr. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 711(P) or 713(P)
821 Field Instruction III. 4 cr. G.
Second-year supervised social work practice in a social agency. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 811(C) or 915(C); 722(P); 711(P) or 713(P).
822 Field Instruction IV. 4 cr. G.
Advanced second-year supervised social work practice in a social agency with emphasis on integration of professional practice with methodology, behavioral sciences, research and policy concerns. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 821(P).
825 Supervision and Consultation for Direct Service. 2 cr. G.
Methods employed by professional social workers in supervisory, leadership and consultative relationships with other types of welfare personnel. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 711 or 718 or 864.
830 Intervention Strategies for Correctional Clients. 3 cr. G.
A review and analysis of intervention approaches and programs used with correctional clients, both juvenile and adult, with emphasis on diversion, prevention, and rehabilitation strategies. Prereq: grad st.
831 Models of Family Therapy. 2 cr. G.
Introduction to the major family therapy approaches, including assessment and intervention techniques for each. Models include systemic, structural, strategic, interactional and multigenerational. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 811 or conc reg.
832 Social Work Practice with Couples. 2 cr. G.
Intensive examination of varied methodologies to effect therapeutic change in couples. Includes assessing couples' interactional patterns and formulating therapeutic strategies. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 811 or conc reg; cons instr.
835 Sex Related Issues and Topics. 2 cr. G.
Physiology, psychology, and sociology of sex-related issues and topics to prepare professional to assist in these areas or to make an appropriate referral. Prereq: grad st.
851 Social Issue and Policy Analysis: (Subtitled). 2-3 cr. G.
Advanced level analysis of the relationship between selected problem areas, policy development and service system. May be repeated with change in topic to max of 9 cr. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 750(P) or BSW degree.
888 Candidate for Degree. 0 cr. G.
Available for graduate students who must meet minimum credit load requirement. Fee for 1 cr assessed. Prereq: grad st.
901 Philosophy of Science. 3 cr. G.
Analyzes philosophical foundations of science, knowledge building processes, and the scope and nature of knowledge, emphasizing applications for the social and behavioral sciences. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Soc Wrk Ph.D. program or written cons instr.
915 Human Services Administration II. 3 cr. G.
The role of the professional in the human services administrative organization, focusing on interpersonal relationships in supervision, evaluation and leadership. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 713; 722 or conc reg.
921 Field Instruction V. 3-4 cr. G.
Optional advanced supervised social work practice in a social agency. Prereq: grad st; Soc Wrk 822.
931 Theories of Poverty and Social Welfare Policy. 3 cr. G.
Analyzes anti-poverty policies/programs, populations at risk, poverty dynamics, poverty-rate trends, circumstances of the poor, poverty etiology and government roles in income redistribution and social change. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Social Work Ph.D. program or written cons instr
932 Theories and Research on Behavior Change. 3 cr. G.
Theory and research of individual change from a social work perspective using classic to recent models, with application to diverse populations. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Soc Wrk Ph.D. program or written cons instr.
940 Applied Gerontology Capstone I. 2 cr. G.
Professional socialization seminar emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of gerontology and exposing students to professional and library resources for continuing professional development. Sociol 940 and Soc Wrk 940 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st; Nurs 760(P) & Soc Wrk 851(P).
941 Applied Gerontology Capstone II. 2-3 cr. G.
Teamwork applied research project conducted in collaboration with a community-based organization that serves the elderly; presentation of findings to a professional audience. Sociol 941 and Soc Wrk 941 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Students who intend to prepare a manuscript for publication enroll for 3 crs; all others enroll for 2 crs. Prereq: grad st; Sociol or Soc Wrk 940(P).
942 The Family and Long-Term Care. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on the role of family in providing long term care. Social values, public policies, and consequences for individuals and society. Sociol 942 & Soc Wrk 942 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st.
945 Family and Long-Term Care Across the Life Course. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on the family role in the provision of long term care within the context of kinship care, and care of persons with chronic illnesses, developmental and adult disabilities. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Soc Wrk Ph.D. prog or writ cons instr.
951 Quantitative Research Methods. 3 cr. G.
An in-depth, hands-on review of experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental approaches to the design and implementation of quantitative research studies. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Social Work Ph.D. Program or written cons instr
952 Qualitative Research Methods in Social Work. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on the philosophical and methodological issues of qualitative research. Students will conduct exploratory original field research and produce a research proposal based on their findings. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Soc Wrk Ph.D. prog or writ cons instr.
961 Introduction to Statistical Methods. 4 cr. G.
Reviews basic parametric and nonparametric tests, including descriptive statistics, correlation, basic inferential statistics, one- and two-way ANOVA, OLS regression, nonparametric statistics, and handling missing data. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Social Work Ph.D. program or written cons instr
962 Applied Multiple Regression Analysis. 3 cr. G.
Multiple regression analysis concentrating on OLS regression techniques but also covering logistic and Poisson regression. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Social Work Ph.D. program or written cons instr.
963 Measurement Methods and Related Multivariate Statistics. 3 cr. G.
Survey of concepts and applications of Classical True Score and Item Response Theory and multivariate statistical methods relevant to test evaluation and construction. Prereq: grad st; SocWrk 961(P) & 962(P); admis to the Soc Wrk Ph.D. program or written cons instr.
964 Advanced Statistical Methods. 3 cr. G.
Covers multivariate statistical procedures, including MANOVA, MANCOVA, canonical correlation and discriminant function analysis, Poisson regression, survival analysis, multilevel modeling, and analysis of longitudinal data. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Soc Wrk Ph.D. program or written cons instr.
970 Independent Research. 1-4 cr. G.
Participation in an independent research project under faculty supervision. Students shall not take more than 6 cr total between courses Soc Wrk 970(P) & 999(P). Prereq: grad st; cons instr; Soc Wrk 662(P)
990 Doctoral Research. 1-12 cr. G.
Research connected with dissertation. Prereq: grad st. & admis to candidacy for Ph.D. degree.
991 Doctoral Proseminar: (Subtitled). 1 cr. G.
Variable content course with specific topics to be announced in schedule of classes. May be repeated with change in topic to 6 cr max. Prereq: grad st; admis to the Social Work Ph.D. Program or written cons instr
999 Independent Reading in Social Work. 1-3 cr. G.
Work suited to individual graduate students arranged. Students shall not take more than 6 cr total between courses Soc Wrk 970(P) & 999(P). Prereq: grad st; completion of foundation courses for non-BSW students; writ cons instr & dir of Soc Wrk prog.

Page last updated on: 11/05/2014