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Psychology

School/College: College of Letters and Science

Degrees Conferred:

  • M.S. in Psychology
  • Ph.D. in Psychology

Contents:

Overview

The Department of Psychology offers four graduate programs:

Ph.D. in Psychology

  • Clinical psychology program (accredited by the American Psychological Association), which includes earning the M.S. degree.
  • Experimental psychology program with a choice of three areas of emphasis: behavior analysis, health and social psychology, or neuroscience. Includes earning the M.S. degree.

M.S. in Psychology

  • Terminal experimental psychology program with a specialization in behavior analysis.
  • Terminal experimental psychology program with a specialization in health psychology.

All programs train students in the facts, methodologies, and theories of psychology, with special emphasis on developing research competence. The department has well-equipped laboratories and an on-campus training clinic. The city of Milwaukee provides additional opportunities for training at hospitals, social service agencies, and the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Note that the department's doctoral programs are actually combined M.S./Ph.D. programs, although students who already have a master's degree in psychology are also encouraged to apply. If admitted, they will not be required to earn the M.S. at UWM if their master's degree included an empirically based thesis.

Transfer from clinical to experimental, or vice versa, requires reapplication. Although it is possible for the academic portion of the doctoral program to be completed in four years, most students require five or more years. Doctoral students are expected to be enrolled full time and to earn their Ph.D.'s within seven years of initial enrollment, exclusive of the one-year internship required in the clinical program.

Students seeking only master's-level training may apply to either the health psychology or the behavior analysis specializations; there are no other terminal master's programs in the Department of Psychology. Transfer from health psychology to behavior analysis, or vice versa, requires reapplication. It is possible to complete requirements for the M.S. in two or three years of full-time study. Part-time study is allowable, as long as the M.S. is earned within seven years of enrolling.

Students may not earn more than two degrees from the Department of Psychology at UWM. Therefore, students who earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from UWM are not eligible to apply for admission to the doctoral program unless they earned a master's degree in psychology elsewhere.

The department refers students interested in Counseling Psychology or School Psychology to the Department of Educational Psychology.

Graduate Faculty

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Professors
Davies, W. Hobart, Ph.D., Michigan State University, Chair
Fleming, Raymond, Ph.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
Frick, Karyn, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
Helmstetter, Fred J., Ph.D., Dartmouth College
Moore, John C., Ph.D., University of California-San Diego
Osmon, David C., Ph.D., University of South Dakota
Reddy, Diane M., Ph.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
Swain, Rodney A., Ph.D., University of Southern California
Associate Professors
Cahill, Shawn, Ph.D., State University of New York-Binghamton
Dermer, Marshall L., Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Greene, Anthony J., Ph.D., Boston College
Klein-Tasman, Bonita, Ph.D., Emory University
Larson, Christine, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Lima, Susan D., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Merritt, Marcellus, Ph.D., Howard University
Mosack, Katie, Ph.D., Ohio State University
Moyer, James R., Ph.D., Northwestern University
Ridley, Robyn, Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia
Assistant Professors
Diba, Kamran, Ph.D., Brown University
Driscoll, Ira, Ph.D., University of Lethbridge
Greenberg, Adam, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
Hannula, Deborah, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Lee, Han Joo, Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin
Lisdahl, Krista M., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati
Mueller, Devin, Ph.D., Concordia University, Quebec
Tiger, Jeffrey, Ph.D., University of Kansas

Master of Science in Psychology

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Application

Application must be made to both the Graduate School and the Department of Psychology (see below for the link to the department's graduate admissions Web site). In addition to materials required by the Graduate School, the applicant should submit the following to the Graduate Admissions Committee of the Department of Psychology:

  1. Transcripts of all undergraduate and previous graduate work. (Although the Graduate School requires official copies, the Department accepts unofficial copies.)
  2. GRE examination scores.
  3. Letters of recommendation.
  4. The completed departmental application form.

Applicants are admitted only at the beginning of each academic year. Applications should be submitted by December 1 (clinical doctoral program) or December 31 (other graduate programs). Important: It is essential to consult the department's Web site for application forms and important information, including the departmental admissions brochure: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/psychology/graduate/gradapp.cfm

Admission

An applicant must meet Graduate School requirements plus the following departmental requirements to be considered for admission to the program:

  1. Completion of an undergraduate major in psychology (or neuroscience).
  2. Submission of scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  3. Receipt of positive recommendation by the Admissions Committee.

Admission is based on evaluations of an applicant's entire record. In evaluating each application, the Admissions Committee examines such factors as test scores, courses taken, involvement in independent research and study projects, and letters of recommendation.

Students without an undergraduate major in psychology may be considered for admission provided the following courses are completed: introductory statistics, a laboratory course in research methods of psychology, and an advanced laboratory course in psychology. Students with one of these courses are eligible to apply, but the two remaining courses would have to be completed within three semesters of enrollment. No course credits earned in making up deficiencies may be counted as program credits required for the degree. Students satisfying only this very minimal requirement should understand that additional work may be required to enroll in specific graduate-level courses.

Advising and the Major Professor

Graduate School and departmental regulations require students to have a major professor to direct their research activities. It is important for students to start their research early in their graduate studies. Admittees are assigned to a major professor they have chosen during the admissions process.

Before the end of the second semester, the student must form an advisory committee of three departmental faculty members, including the student's major professor. Students are free to change their major professor at any time. The Department also provides a Graduate Program Coordinator, who advises about courses and program requirements and who approves programs of study. The Graduate Program Coordinator is also available to help students who wish to change their major professors to find new ones.

Credits and Courses: General Psychology Track

Students in the general psychology track must be simultaneously enrolled in the doctoral program. The minimum requirement for the M.S. is 30 graduate credits of psychology, 24 of which must be earned in formal coursework (excluding practica) and 6 of which must be earned through an acceptable thesis.

Thesis

The student, under the direction of an advisor, must develop an acceptable thesis based on empirical research. The student must pass an oral examination in defense of the thesis.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within three years of initial enrollment.

Credits and Courses: Specialization in Health Psychology

Health psychology is concerned with the psychological variables that influence physical health and illness. The M.S. program in health psychology offers training in research and theories relevant to health promotion. The program of study consists of core health psychology coursework, research coursework, psychology breadth coursework, and an optional field placement. Current research topics include gender and health, cancer prevention and health education, reproductive health and STD prevention, patient advocacy and self-care behaviors, the effects of stress and mechanisms of coping with it, and child abuse prevention. Research is conducted in the laboratory as well as in clinical settings, and many members of the faculty have strong ties to the Milwaukee community.

Course of Study

The course of study consists of at least 36 credits, distributed as follows:

Core Health Psychology Courses (12 credits)
Psych 955 (Seminar in Social Psychology and Health)
Any three of the following courses:
Psych 578 Psychology of Race, Ethnicity, and Health
Psych 754 Proseminar in Biological Psychology
Psych 756 Psychophysiology
Psych 711 Current Topics in Psychology (health-related topic)
Psych 833 Neuropsychology
Psych 854 Behavioral Neuroscience
Psych 930 Seminar in Social Psychology
Psych 954 Seminar in Physiological Psychology
Research coursework (15 credits)
Psych 510 Advanced Psychological Statistics
Psych 610 Experimental Design
Psych 932 Seminar in Evaluation Research or an acceptable equivalent course, as determined by area faculty
Psych 790 Master's Research -- 6 cr
Breadth coursework (9 credits)
Students choose breadth courses in consultation with their advisors.

The M.S. specialty in health psychology emphasizes the application of psychological theories to health-related issues. Although students are exposed to theories and applications in coursework, the field placement option offers a further opportunity to learn by doing. Students are encouraged to take at least 3 credits of 812 (Field Placement in Psychology) in their area of interest.

Thesis or Project

The student, under the direction of an advisor, has the option of developing either an acceptable thesis based on empirical research or an acceptable project (a review or theoretical paper). In either case, students must demonstrate their ability to formulate a research idea and pursue independent and original investigation. The student must pass an oral examination in defense of the thesis, but no oral examination is required for a project.

Time Limit

The student must complete all requirements within seven years of initial enrollment.

Credits and Courses: Specialization in Behavior Analysis

Behavior analysis focuses on how the interactions between an organism and its environment regulate its behavior. This M.S. specialization prepares students to become Board Certified Behavior Analysts® as well as to continue on to advanced studies. Students may focus on either basic or applied studies and must complete a final empirical thesis or empirical project, which may be conducted in laboratory or field settings. Research areas include the study of choice behavior in pigeons; procedures to enhance students' verbal skills (as in acquiring a second language and writing concisely); and the use of behavior analytic techniques to address repetitive behavior disorders and developmental disabilities, including autism.

The Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB), Inc® has approved our course sequence as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Behavior Analyst Examination® to become BCBA's (nationally) and licensed behavior analysts (in Wisconsin). The BACB® also requires applicants to be experienced in providing behavior-analytic services. We have developed relationships with local providers to assist students in completing their practicum hours.

Course of Study

The course of study consists of at least 31 credits, distributed as follows:

Core behavior analytic coursework (16 credits)
Psych 502 Applied Behavior Analysis
Psych 714 Conditioning and Learning
Psych 724 Proseminar in Behavior Analysis
Psych 725 Ethical and Professional Conduct for Behavior Analysts
And any one of the following four courses:
Psych 736 Functional Assessment and Intervention
Psych 914 Seminar in Stimulus Control
Psych 915 Seminar in Operant Behavior
Psych 919 Seminar in Classical Conditioning
Research Methods (9 credits)
Psych 510 Advanced Psychological Statistics
Psych 610 Experimental Design
Psych 620 Single-Subject Research Methods
Six credits in 790 Master's Research

Depending on students' goals and the advice of their advisors, they also may enroll in Psych 730 (Practicum in Behavior Analysis).

Thesis or Project

The student, under the direction of his or her major professor, must develop an empirical thesis or empirical project, which the student must defend in an oral examination. Students focusing on basic studies complete a thesis. Depending on the recommendation of their advisors, students focusing on applied studies complete either a thesis or a project that demonstrates their competence at delivering services.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within seven years of initial enrollment.

Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology

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Application

Application must be made to both the Graduate School and the Department of Psychology. In addition to materials required by the Graduate School, the applicant should submit to the Graduate Admissions Committee of the Department of Psychology transcripts of all undergraduate and previous graduate work (although the Graduate School requires official copies, the Department accepts unofficial copies); GRE examination scores; letters of recommendation; and the completed departmental application form. Applicants are admitted only at the beginning of each academic year. Applications should be submitted by December 1 (clinical doctoral program) or December 31 (other graduate programs). Important: It is essential to consult the department's website for application forms and important information, including the departmental admissions brochure: http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/psychology/graduate/gradapp.cfm

Admission

An applicant must meet Graduate School requirements and the following departmental requirements to be considered for admission to the program:

  1. Completion of an undergraduate major in psychology (or neuroscience).
  2. Submission of scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination.
  3. Receipt of a positive recommendation by the Admissions Committee.

Admission is based on evaluation of an applicant's entire record. In evaluating each application, the Admissions Committee examines such factors as GRE scores, grades, research record (e.g., research apprenticeships, publications, presentations, and senior or honors theses), and letters of recommendation.

Students without an undergraduate major in psychology (or neuroscience) may be considered for admission provided the following courses are completed: introductory statistics, a laboratory course in research methods of psychology, and an advanced laboratory course in psychology. Students with one of these courses are eligible to apply, but the two remaining courses would have to be completed within three semesters of enrollment. No course credits earned in making up deficiencies may be counted as program credits required for the degree. Students satisfying only this very minimal requirement should understand that additional work may be required to enroll in specific graduate-level courses.

As part of their doctoral requirements, Ph.D. students must earn a master's degree in psychology that includes a thesis derived from empirical research; they do this by fulfilling the requirements of the "General Psychology Track" for the M.S. degree, described above, while enrolled simultaneously in the Ph.D. program. An exception is that students who already have earned a master's degree based on an empirical thesis in psychology or neuroscience from another college or university are exempt from the requirement of earning the M.S. in our department.

Advising and the Major Professor

Graduate School and departmental regulations require students to have a major professor to direct their research activities. Entering students are assigned to the major professor they have chosen during the admissions process. Students are free to change their major professor at any time. The Department provides a Graduate Program Coordinator, who advises about courses and program requirements and who approves programs of study. The Graduate Program Coordinator also is available to help any student who wishes to change his/her major professor.

Course of Study

The minimum degree requirement is 54 graduate credits beyond the bachelor's degree, at least 27 of which must be earned in residence at UWM.

Departmental doctoral curriculum

Only courses numbered 700 or above and a few departmentally-designated undergraduate/graduate courses, including Psych 510 and 610, may be counted in the doctoral curriculum, which is specified in the department's Doctoral Student Handbook.

Majors

Students in our clinical program satisfy their major by completing a sequence of required courses, including courses in professional ethics, issues, and research methods in clinical psychology; developmental psychopathology; foundations of psychotherapy; courses in assessment; and empirically-supported interventions. In addition to classroom courses, students majoring in clinical psychology also must complete a sequence of practicum courses for intensive training in assessment, diagnosis, therapy, and professional practice and, later, a pre-doctoral, extramural, full-time (2,000 hours) internship. Students should consult the department's Doctoral Student Handbook for details.

The clinical program strongly adheres to the scientist-practitioner model of training. It is designed to train psychologists as generalists. However, our faculty members interests cluster in three primary areas including neuroscience/neuropsychology, behavior therapy, and pediatric/health psychology. As a result, students often leave the clinical program with a focus in one or more of these areas. The clinical program is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA).* The program has been accredited continually since 1980. In addition, the clinical program is a member of the Academy of Psychological Clinical Science. Membership in the Academy is granted only after a thorough peer review process. Our membership in the Academy indicates our commitment to excellence in scientific training and to using clinical science as the foundation for designing, implementing, and evaluating assessment and intervention procedures.

In consultation with their major professors, students in the experimental program choose a major in one of the following three areas:

  • Neuroscience
  • Health and social psychology
  • Behavior analysis

In rare instances, with the consent of the major professor, it is possible to major in developmental psychology or in cognition and perception.

An experimental major is a program of integrated study. Each departmental major consists of designated courses as listed in the department's Doctoral Student Handbook.

* Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation 750 First Street, NE Washington, DC 20002-4242. Phone: 202-336-5979

About the Major in Neuroscience

Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field devoted to the study of the nervous system. The major is designed to provide students with the intellectual and technical skills necessary for a productive career in academics or industry. The core faculty members are located in the psychology and biological sciences departments, and graduate students have frequent interactions with the faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and other students through coursework, research collaborations, and weekly seminars. Students also are part of the greater Milwaukee Area Neuroscience group, which includes faculty members and students from UWM, the Medical College of Wisconsin, and Marquette University. Students majoring in neuroscience learn a wide range of techniques working with laboratory animals and human subjects. These include, but are not limited to, experimental design, behavioral testing and analysis, neurophysiology, aseptic surgical techniques, quantitative protein and mRNA assays, immunohistochemistry, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Current research topics investigated by faculty members and students include cellular and molecular mechanisms of learning and memory; mapping brain areas involved in memory and emotion in humans and rodents using fMRI; effects of exercise on cerebral blood flow; mechanisms of recovery from brain damage; effects of aging on learning and memory; and the role of calcium and calcium-binding proteins in ischemic cell death.

About the Major in Health and Social Psychology

Health psychology, which is concerned with the psychological variables that influence physical health and illness, has become a dominant force in the health sciences, a field to which social psychological theories and research have much to offer. The major in health and social psychology offers training in research and theories relevant to health promotion. Faculty members and students work together on projects focused on gender and health, cancer prevention and health education, reproductive health and STD prevention, patient advocacy and self-care behaviors, the effects of stress and mechanisms of coping with it, and child abuse prevention. Research is conducted in the laboratory as well as in clinical settings, and many members of the faculty have strong ties to the Milwaukee community.

About the Major in Behavior Analysis

Behavior analysis emphasizes environmental control of the behavior of the individual organism. The major in behavior analysis provides broad theoretical, conceptual, and research training. Students enrolled in this doctoral program may focus on the experimental or applied analysis of behavior. Students and faculty members work together to investigate the fundamental relations between an organism's behavior and environmental events as well as techniques to apply these basic findings to a variety of situations in which a change in behavior is desired. Current research projects include translational research on self-awareness; procedures to enhance students' verbal skills (as in acquiring a second language and writing concisely); and treatment of individuals with developmental disabilities, including autism.

The Behavior Analysis Certification Board, Inc® has approved our course sequence as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Behavior Analyst Examination® to become BCBA's (nationally)and licensed behavior analysts (in Wisconsin). The BACB® also requires applicants to be experienced in providing behavior-analytic services. We have developed relationships with local providers to assist students in completing their practicum hours.

Departmental Minors

Students in the clinical program complete one departmental minor, and students in the experimental program complete two departmental minors if they are majoring in health and social psychology or neuroscience, or one departmental minor if they are majoring in behavior analysis. Departmental minors are chosen in consultation with the major professor from among the following areas:

  • Neuroscience
  • Cognition and perception
  • Behavior analysis
  • Health and social psychology
  • Developmental psychology
  • Psychopathology (experimental students only)
  • Quantitative methods
  • Neurobiology (neuroscience students only)

Note that quantitative methods and neurobiology, although counted as departmental minors, actually involve extradepartmental coursework. Each departmental minor consists of designated courses as listed in the department's Doctoral Student Handbook.

Statistics, Research Design, and History of Psychology Requirements

All students must complete advanced statistics(Psych 510) and experimental design (Psych 610). Clinical students, but not experimental students, must complete history of psychology (Psych 750).

Breadth Requirement

Experimental students must complete one psychology course in an area other than their major and minor areas. Clinical students follow American Psychological Association (APA) requirements and complete one course from each of the following areas:

  • Biological bases of behavior
  • Cognitive/affective bases of behavior
  • Social bases of behavior.

Clinical students may count coursework in their departmental minor toward a breadth requirement, if appropriate.

Multicultural Requirement

Clinical students must complete a course in multicultural issues in clinical or counseling psychology.

Developmental Psychology Requirement

Clinical students must complete a graduate-level lifespan developmental psychology course (Psych 762).

Extradepartmental Minors and Certificates (optional)

If they wish, and with the approval of their major professors, students may complete, in another department, a coherent program of at least 8 graduate credits (undergraduate/graduate courses taken for graduate credit apply). They may also, if they wish, complete one or more graduate certificate programs.

Residence

The student must meet minimum Graduate School residence requirements. Please note the requirement of earning at least 27 graduate credits at UWM. For more information on residence, see the Graduate School Doctoral Requirements page.

Doctoral Preliminary Examination

Students must pass a doctoral preliminary examination to qualify for formal admission to candidacy for the degree. The examination focuses on the student's major area of study and can be taken only after the master's degree has been earned and all relevant coursework has been completed satisfactorily. Specific guidelines for preliminary examinations in the various major areas can be found in the department's Doctoral Student Handbook.

Clinical Internship Requirement

With the approval of the department's Clinical Training Committee, clinical students are eligible to begin a required one-year, 2,000-hour internship after they have passed the preliminary examination and the doctoral dissertation proposal hearing.

Dissertation Defense

The candidate must write a dissertation that demonstrates the ability to formulate a research topic and pursue independent and original investigation.

Final Oral Examination

The candidate must, as the final step toward the degree, pass an oral examination in defense of the dissertation.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within seven years of initial enrollment (four years if entering with a master's degree), excluding internship.

For additional information on the Ph.D., see the Graduate School Doctoral Requirements page.

Courses

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Courses numbered 300-699 are Undergraduate/Graduate. Courses numbered 700 and above are Graduate only.

497 Study Abroad: (Subtitled). 1-12 cr. U/G.
Designed to enroll students in UWM sponsored programs before course work level, content and credits are determined and/or in specially prepared program course work. Retakable w/chg in topic. Prereq: jr st; acceptance for Study Abroad Prog.
502 Applied Behavior Analysis. 4 cr. U/G.
Learning and motivation of human behavior in applied settings. Lab work in community agencies using operant methods, behavior modification, programmed instruction, AV systems. Lec, Lab. Prereq: jr st; Psych 325(P).
503 Perception. 3 cr. U/G.
The nature of perception and its relation to environmental and internal processes. Systems course. Prereq: jr st; 9 cr in psych.
505 Cognitive Processes. 4 cr. U/G.
Human information processing, emphasizing vision and language. Topics: pattern recognition; sensory-specific memory systems, short- and long-term; modern approaches to mental imagery and operations. Lec, lab. Prereq: jr st; Psych 325(P).
506 Perceptual Learning. 4 cr. U/G.
Role of special learning mechanisms in the normal development of perception and in compensation for handicaps. Lec, Lab. Prereq: jr st; Psych 325(P).
510 Advanced Psychological Statistics. 3 cr. U/G.
Topics include probability and sampling theory, correlational methods, and nonparametric techniques. Foundations course. Prereq: jr st & Psych 210(P); or grad st.
514 Conditioning and Learning. 4 cr. U/G.
Principles of conditioning and learning. Lec, lab. Required special course fee assessed; announced in Schedule of Classes each semester. Prereq: jr st; Psych 325(P).
550 History of Psychology. 3 cr. U/G.
The important philosophical and scientific antecedents of contemporary psychology. Systems course. Prereq: jr st; 9 cr in psych.
551 Learning and Motivation Theories. 3 cr. U/G.
Contemporary psychological theories, with special emphasis on theories of learning. Systems course. Prereq: jr st; 9 cr in psych.
578 Psychology of Race, Ethnicity, and Health. 3 cr. U/G.
Psychological theory and research on how health is related to race and ethnicity. Foundations course. No cr for students w/cr in Psych 611 w/similar topic. Prereq: jr st, Psych 101(P); or grad st.
609 Motivation. 3 cr. U/G.
Systematic analysis of reinforcement, drive, arousal, and recent neurophysiological research related to motivation and emotion. Systems course. Prereq: jr st; Psych 254(P) or cons instr.
610 Experimental Design. 3 cr. U/G.
Design and analysis of single and multi-factor experiments; tests for trends; multiple comparisons. Foundations course. Prereq: jr st & Psych 210(P); or grad st.
611 Current Topics: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Specific topics and any additional prerequisites will be announced in the Schedule of Classes each time the course is offered. Foundations course. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st.
620 Single-Subject Research Methods. 3 cr. U/G.
A review of single-subject research methods. Foundations course. Prereq: jr st & Psych 325(P), or grad st; or cons instr.
654 (effective 05/19/2014) Advanced Physiological Psychology. 4 cr. U/G.
Advanced topics in physiological psychology. Lec, lab. Required special course fee assessed; announced in Schedule of Classes each sem. Prereq: jr st; Psych 254(P) & 325(P).
654 Advanced Physiological Psychology. 4 cr. U/G.
Advanced topics in physiological psychology. Lec, lab. Required special course fee assessed; announced in Schedule of Classes each sem. Prereq: jr st; Psych 254(P) & 325(P).
657 Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 3 cr. U/G.
Functional and structural alterations in nervous system underlying organism's ability to learn/remember. Principles drawn from molecular and cellular neurobiology, neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, and behavioral neuroscience. Systems course. Counts as repeat of Psych 611 w/same topic. Prereq: jr st.
660 Experimental Child Psychology. 4 cr. U/G.
Experimental investigation of child behavior and development. Lec, lab. Prereq: jr st; Psych 260(R) & 325(P).
677 Experimental Social Psychology. 4 cr. U/G.
Experimental investigation of social behavior. Lec, lab. Prereq: jr st; Psych 230(R) & 325(P).
680 Psychology of Aging. 3 cr. U/G.
Extension of principles of general psychology to the process of aging. Systems course. Prereq: jr st; Psych 325(P) or cons instr.
685 Seminar on Writing in Psychology. 3 cr. U/G.
Review and practice of various forms of psychological writing, emphasizing clear communication with various classes of readers, e.g., other researchers, grant proposal reviewers, lay people. Foundations course. Prereq: jr st & Psych 325(P), or grad st; or cons instr.
702 Applied Behavior Analysis. 3 cr. G.
Use of learning principles and procedures to solve behavior problems. 3 hrs lec, 1 hr dis. Prereq: grad st.
705 Information Processing. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to cognitive psychology from an information processing perspective. Core course in cognition for the cognition/perception area. Prereq: grad st.
706 Psychology of Language. 3 cr. G.
An overview of the cognitive processes involved in language comprehension. An advanced course in cognition for the cognition/perception area. Prereq: grad st; some background in linguis or cognitive psych recom, e.g. Psych 705(R).
710 Survey of Clinical Research Methods. 3 cr. G.
Various research methods in clinical psychology. Prereq: grad st.
711 Current Topics in Psychology: (Subtitled). 1-4 cr. G.
Specific topics and any additional prerequisites will be announced in the schedule of classes each time the course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
712 Professional Ethics and Issues in Clinical Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to clinical practice and ethics. Prereq: grad st.
714 Conditioning and Learning. 3 cr. G.
Principles of classical conditioning and instrumental learning. 3 hr lec, 1 hr dis Prereq: grad st.
724 Proseminar in Behavior Analysis. 3 cr. G.
A review of conceptual, methodological, and professional issues associated with the science and application of behavior analysis. Prereq: grad st.
725 Ethical and Professional Conduct for Behavior Analysts. 3 cr. G.
Ethical and professional issues pertaining to behavior analysts working in clinical, educational, academic, and other settings. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
727 Cognitive Neuroscience. 3 cr. G.
How the brain enables the mind; broad introduction to cognitive neuroscience, with emphasis on a converging methods approach. Counts as repeat of 711 w/same topic. Prereq: grad st.
730 Practicum in Behavior Analysis. 3 cr. G.
Hands-on experience providing behavior analysis services. Retakable to 12 cr max. Prereq: grad st; cons instr & placement supervisor.
734 Introduction to Scientifically-Validated Treatments. 1 cr. G.
The use of psychological interventions for treating numerous psychological conditions. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
736 Functional Assessment and Intervention. 3 cr. G.
Methods for determining the variables of which behavior is a function and selecting function-based interventions. Prereq: grad st
741 Foundations of Psychotherapy. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to psychotherapies: origins, orientations, procedures, and empirical support. Prereq: grad st.
742 Empirically-Supported Interventions. 3 cr. G.
Research-supported therapy protocols for a variety of behavioral disorders; didactic instruction and role-play practice/feedback. Prereq: grad st; some background in psychopathology & systems of psychotherapy recom.
750 The History of Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Examination of the grounding of modern psychological theory and practice in the history of western culture. 3 hrs lec, 1 hr dis. Not open to students with cr in Psych 550(ER). Prereq: grad st.
754 Proseminar in Biological Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Overview of current topics in neuroscience including neuropsychopharmacology, neuropsychology, psychophysiology, and behavioral medicine. Prereq: grad st.
756 Psychophysiology. 3 cr. G.
Experimental investigation of physiological factors in behavior. 2 hrs lec; 1 hr dis. Not open to students with cr in Psych 656(ER). Prereq: grad st.
760 Experimental Child Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Investigation of experimental research relating to infant and child behavior. Lec, Lab, Dis. No cr for students w/cr in Psych 660(ER). Prereq: grad st.
762 Lifespan Developmental Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Survey of developmental theory from a life-span perspective, with an emphasis on historical roots of developmental psychology, contemporary integrated theoretical perspectives, and cross-cultural perspectives. Prereq: grad st.
790 Masters Research. 1-6 cr. G.
Retakable. Prereq: grad st & cons advisory committee.
791 Project in Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Independent research with a faculty member to fulfill the master's thesis requirement for incoming students with a master's degree without a thesis. Prereq: grad st; cons advisory committee.
799 Advanced Independent Study. 1-6 cr. G.
Retakable w/chg in topic. Prereq: grad st & sponsorship by a faculty member.
802 First-Year Clinical Psychology Practicum. 3 cr. G.
Administration of psychological tests to clinic clients; interviewing, contact with referred sources, feedback of test results to clients, written reports and co-therapy with experienced therapist. Retakable to 6 cr max. Prereq: grad st; clinical training prog; cons instr.
811 Community Placement in Clinical Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Specific agency and additional prerequisites announced in the schedule of classes each time the course is offered. Retakable w/chg of placement to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st; cons instr & placement supervisor.
812 Field Placement in Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Retakable for cr. Prereq: grad st; cons instr & placement supervisor.
821 Practicum in Assessment I. 3 cr. G.
Practical experience utilizing techniques used in Assessment I (Psych 831). Prereq: grad st; Psych 712(P), 801(P), 912(P); clinical training prog. Conc reg Psych 831(C) by clinical Psych students.
822 Practicum in Assessment II. 3 cr. G.
Practical experience utilizing techniques used in Assessment II (Psych 832). Prereq: grad st; Psych 821(P); clinical training prog. Psych 832(C) by clinical psych students.
831 Assessment I. 3 cr. G.
Objective techniques used in the appraisal of personality and intellectual processes. Prereq: grad st.
832 Assessment II. 3 cr. G.
Neuropsychological, child-focused, and projective techniques used in the appraisal of personality and intellectual processes. Prereq: grad st; Psych 831(P).
833 Neuropsychology. 3 cr. G.
Anatomy, pathology, and neuropsychology of the higher brain functions in humans.Prereq: grad st.
834 Seminar in Advanced Assessment: 3 cr. G.
Specific topics and any additional prerequisites will be announced in the Timetable each time the course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st: Psych 831(P).
842 Practicum in Therapy. 4 cr. G.
Supervised practicum experience with therapeutic techniques used in clinical psychology. Prereq: grad st; Psych 712(P).
844 Practicum in Clinical Supervision. 3 cr. G.
Practicum to enhance theoretical and practical skills for supervising clinical work. Retakable to 12 cr max. Prereq: grad st; completion of all required clinical Psych courses & practica.
845 Practicum in Empirically-Supported Interventions. 1-3 cr. G.
Application of techniques learned in Psych 742 (Empirically-Supported Interventions). Retakable once to 3 cr max. Prereq: grad st; Psych 742(C).
854 Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to current research and theory regarding the neural basis of behavior. Not open to students who have cr in Psych 654(ER). Prereq: grad st.
888 Candidate for Degree. 0 cr. G.
Available for graduate students who must meet minimum credit load requirement. Fee for 1 cr assessed. Prereq: grad st.
890 Graduate Research. 1-6 cr. G.
Retakable. Prereq: grad st & sponsorship by a grad faculty member.
911 Current Topics and Techniques in Clinical Psychology: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max for masters students & 12 cr max for doctoral students. Prereq: grad st.
912 Developmental Psychopathology. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on concepts and research in the scientific study of psychopathology across the lifespan Prereq: grad st.
914 Seminar in Stimulus Control. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on topics of traditional and contemporary theoretical interest in stimulus control. Prereq: grad st; Psych 714(P) or equiv.
915 Seminar in Operant Behavior. 3 cr. G.
Prereq: grad st.
919 Seminar in Classical Conditioning. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on topics of empirical and theoretical interest in classical conditioning. Prereq: grad st; Psych 714(P) or equiv.
930 Seminar in Social Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Prereq: grad st.
932 Proseminar in Evaluation Research. 3 cr. G.
In-depth examination of experimental and quasi-experimental methodologies for assessing the impact of social innovations; factors impeding implementation of such methodologies; utilization of available findings. Prereq: grad st.
933 Seminar in Neuroscience. 1 cr. G.
Student presentations in cellular, molecular, and behavioral neuroscience. Retakable to 3 cr max. Psych 933 & Bio Sci 933 are jointly offered; students may enroll under only one of the curricular areas in any single semester. Prereq: grad st in Bio Sci, Psych, or Ed Psych or cons instr
954 Seminar in Physiological Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Prereq: grad st.
955 Seminar in Social Psychology and Health. 3 cr. G.
Theoretical and empirical contributions of social psychology to health. Prereq: grad st.
961 (860) Seminar in Child-Clinical Psychology. 3 cr. G.
Diagnosis, etiology, therapy, and research in child-clinical psychology are discussed and criticized. Prereq: grad st.
990 Doctoral Research. 1-6 cr. G.
Retakable. Prereq: grad st & admis to candidacy for Ph.D. degree.
995 Clinical Psychology Internship. 1 or 3 cr. G.
Required internship for students in the clinical psychology PhD program. Retakable. Students who have passed dissertation defense enroll for 1 cr; all others enroll for 3 cr. Prereq: clinical psych doctoral student; dissertator status; proposal hearing passed; cons instr.

Page last updated on: 01/29/2014