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Library and Information Science

School/College: School of Information Studies

Degrees Conferred:

  • Master of Library and Information Science
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Information Studies

Contents

Related Certificates

Overview

Video Feature:

Wendy Rondeau
She's a full-time, online SOIS graduate student living in Winnipeg, Canada

The School of Information Studies prepares students for careers in the information professions. The School's array of graduate programs provides students with the opportunity to develop attitudes associated with progressive information services, and to develop an understanding of the value, role, and application of modern technology as it relates to library operations and the transfer of information.

In harmony with the mission of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a major urban research institute, the School of Information Studies strives to make significant contributions towards extending and enhancing the quality of information services and the promotion of information and technological literacy to a diverse society. The School of Information Studies is committed to excellence in instruction, research, and service.

Goals of the school are:

  1. To prepare professionals who are able to provide leadership and adapt to change in a technological and knowledge-based environment for careers in libraries, school media centers, information systems, and related areas, according to accepted professional standards.
  2. To enrich the library and information science profession through recruitment of students with strong academic skills from diverse cultural, geographic, and subject backgrounds.
  3. To enable undergraduate students to achieve qualifications to pursue careers in the information professions through the provision of degree and certificate programs.
  4. To enable students to develop specializations in the information professions at the graduate level through the provision of single and dual degree programs.
  5. To promote a research orientation through participation in the Doctor of Philosophy degree program.
  6. To contribute to the international knowledge base of library and information science through research and publication.
  7. To facilitate the development, provision, and evaluation of library and information services through consultation services to individual organizations and leadership in professional associations locally, statewide, nationally, and internationally.
  8. To offer opportunities for professionals and the wider community to update their skills and knowledge through advanced and continuing education courses, workshops, and programs offered nationally and internationally.

Graduate Faculty

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Professors
Aman, Mohammed, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Britz, Johannes, D.D., University of Pretoria
Smiraglia, Richard, Ph.D., University of Chicago
Wolfram, Dietmar, Ph.D., University of Western Ontario
Xie, Hong, Ph.D., Rutgers University
Zhang, Jin., Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh
Associate Professors
Dimitroff, Alexandra, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Du Plessis, Jacques, Ph.D., Utah State University
Haigh, Thomas, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Henderson, Laretta, Ph.D., University of Iowa
Jeong, Wooseob, Ph.D., Florida State University
Lee, Hur-Li, Ph.D., Rutgers University
Newell, Terrance, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Walker, Thomas, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Haigh, Maria, Ph.D., Drexel University
Mu, Xiangming, Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Assistant Professors
Anderson, Kimberly, Ph.D., the University of California, Los Angeles
Babu, Rakesh, Ph.D., The University of North Carolina, Greensboro
Kipp, Margaret, Ph.D., University of Western Ontario
Latham, Joyce, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Moyer, Jessica, Ph.D., University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Peekhaus, Wilhelm, Ph.D., the University of Western Ontario
Ponelis, Shana, Ph.D., University of Praetoria
Zimmer, Michael, Ph.D., New York University

Master's Programs

The purpose of the MLIS program is to prepare librarians and information professionals who are able to manage change in an urbanized, technologically oriented, and knowledge-based society. The MLIS program provides a systematic course of study which enables individuals with a strong service orientation to apply principles of library and information science, use current methods and tools, and recognize the value of research.

Students may elect to specialize according to the type of library or information service which best meets their needs: i.e., school, public, academic, or special; or to follow a more generalized approach. Concentrations in archival studies, information organization, information technology, and public library leadership are available.

Graduates of the Master of Library and Information Science degree program are expected to demonstrate the following competencies:

  1. To apply scientific principles in developing and managing information resources designed to meet user needs and interests.
  2. To analyze, describe, and organize resources for effective and efficient retrieval and dissemination of information.
  3. To utilize knowledge of information sources, services, and systems to meet the informational needs of users.
  4. To apply management principles in planning, developing, marketing, and evaluating library and information services.
  5. To work in specialized areas of library and information service, utilizing knowledge obtained from concentrations within the School and in other disciplines.
  6. To build upon current knowledge of information and communication theories and technologies in planning, design, development, and delivery of information services.

The master's degree program is designed to support each of these objectives with appropriate coursework and educational experiences.

The School of Information Studies in collaboration with the School of Education offers post-bachelor's programs leading to State of Wisconsin licensing as Initial Instructional Library Media Specialist, Instructional Library Media Specialist, and Instructional Library Media Supervisor.

Students admitted to the Master of Library and Information Science degree program can incorporate in their degree program the courses for these licenses to the extent that these courses satisfy the degree requirements, either as required core courses or as electives. Licenses will be granted only to those persons who are eligible to hold a Wisconsin license to teach in the elementary or secondary schools or who have completed an approved elementary or secondary classroom teacher preparation program. For additional information about these licenses and their relationship to the master's degree, consult the School Library Media Coordinator.

The advanced courses offered by the School of Information Studies may be elected on a non-degree basis by post-master's students who wish to continue their professional education or special competence in some phase of urban library and information services. The School's graduate courses are also open to graduate students in other fields of study, provided that they have completed the appropriate basic courses (or their equivalent).

Coordinated Degree Programs

In cooperation with the Peck School of the Arts; the College of Health Sciences; and the College of Letters and Science, the School of Information Studies offers the following coordinated degree programs:

M.S./MLIS

A Master of Science in Anthropology/Master of Library and Information Science to prepare students for positions as curators of museum libraries and as information specialists and researchers for local history collections and state historical societies, 51 credits.

M.A./MLIS

A Master of Arts in English/Master of Library and Information Science program to prepare students for positions as humanities librarians and curators of special subject collections in the humanities, 51 credits.

M.A./MLIS

A Master of Arts in Geography/Master of Library and Information Science program to prepare students for positions as map librarians, 48 credits.

M.S./MLIS

A Master of Science in Health Care Informatics/Master of Library and Information Science program to prepare students for positions as clinical informationists, 56 credits.

M.A./MLIS

A Master of Arts in History/Master of Library and Information Science program to prepare students for positions as archivists, 48 credits.

MALLT/MLIS

A Master of Arts in Language, Literature, and Translation/Master of Library and Information Science program to prepare students for positions as librarians in a variety of libraries and curators of special subject collections, 51 credits.

M.M./MLIS

Master of Music/Master of Library and Information Studies program to prepare students for positions as music librarians. Students in the M.M. degree program will pursue a concentration in Music History and Literature, 54 credits.

M.S./MLIS

A Master of Science in Urban Studies/Master of Library and Information Science program to prepare students for positions as urban information specialists, 54 credits.

M.A./MLIS

A Master of Arts in Women's Studies/Master of Library and Information Science program to prepare students for positions as information specialists in institutions of higher learning, libraries, and research centers, 54 credits.

Prerequisite to the award of either degree in these coordinated programs is the simultaneous award of its counterpart degree. For additional information on these programs, see the Anthropology, English, Language, Literature, and Translation, Geography, Health Care Informatics, History, Music, Urban Studies, and Women's Studies sections of this Web site.

Master of Library and Information Science

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Application

The student must apply to both the Graduate School and the School of Information Studies.

Admission

An applicant must meet Graduate School requirements plus the following additional requirements of the School of Information Studies to be considered for admission to the program:

  1. Submission of scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). (GRE or MAT scores are currently required of domestic applicants and will be required of international applicants beginning with the summer 2004 admission term.) The test scores should be sent directly to the SOIS. This requirement will be waived for applicants whose overall undergraduate GPA, as calculated by the UWM Graduate School, is at least 3.00, or who already hold another master's degree or Ph.D., or the equivalent.
  2. Applicants from foreign institutions are required to submit the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score. The minimum acceptable score is 550 PBT or 79 iBT. A score of 6.5 or higher on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) may be submitted in lieu of the TOEFL.
  3. Two letter of recommendation from persons who can testify to the applicant's likelihood of success in the master's program in library and information science. References from former teachers or employers are preferred.

No prior coursework in library/information science is required. A student whose undergraduate grade point average is below 2.75 (4.0 basis) may be considered for admission on probation. See the Admission on Probation section of this Web site.

Faculty Advisor

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor in the School of Information Studies at the time of admission to the master's program. The name of the faculty advisor is included in the student's letter of admission and may also be obtained from an academic advisor in the School of Information Studies.

Credits and Courses

The minimum degree requirement is 36 graduate credits, 30 of which must be in library and information science and up to 6 of which may be in related areas. Students who have already completed a master's or doctoral degree in a field other than library science may have the library and information science master's program reduced to 30 credits. Under special circumstances, up to 6 of these credits may be from another field in a closely allied area with advisor consent. Students who have completed library science courses at the undergraduate level may, upon request, have their coursework reviewed to determine whether the content was the equivalent of that in required courses in the School of Information Studies Program. However, the establishment of such equivalencies will not reduce the total number of credits required for the master's degree in library and information science, but merely enable the student to avoid unnecessary repetition.

The number of credits needed for each of the coordinated degree programs is 12 credits less than the sum of credits of the two programs if taken separately. All degree requirements of each component program, however, must be satisfied. This includes makeup courses for deficiencies, required courses, and graduation proficiency requirements. The MLIS component of each coordinated program includes 30 credits of SOIS courses including the 12 credits of required courses.

The following are basic required courses:

501 Foundations of Library and Information Science, 3 cr.
511 Organization of Information, 3 cr.
571 Information Access and Retrieval, 3 cr.
591 Introduction to Research Methods in Library and Information Science, 3 cr.

These courses (or their equivalent) must be completed by full-time students by the end of their second semester; for part-time students, two of the courses must be completed by the end of the second semester, and all four by the end of the fifth semester for coursework in the School of Information Studies.

Minimum Grade Requirement in the Basic Required Courses

The minimum grade requirement for 501, 511, 571, and 591 is a B. Students who earn a grade of B- or lower have not met the minimum requirement and will be allowed to repeat the core course once. Students are responsible for tuition in the repeated course. Those who do not meet the minimum grade requirements upon repeating the course will be recommended for academic dismissal. Students may not register for a course for which any of the core courses is a prerequisite until the minimum grade requirement is met.

Archival Studies Concentration

The Archival Studies concentration requires 15 credits of coursework planned in consultation with the student's advisor. Credits for the concentration count as electives for the MLIS. The courses that qualify for the concentration are as follows:

Information Organization Concentration

The Information Organization Concentration requires a minimum of 15 credits of coursework taken from the list of qualifying courses below. The student's concentration program must be approved by the SOIS Information Organization Curriculum Coordinator. A fieldwork experience of 1-3 credits with a focus on information organization is required of students without practical experience.

Courses that qualify for the concentration are as follows:
619 Topics in Information Organization. (Subtitled) (3 credits)
711 Introduction to Cataloging and Classification (3 credits)
712 Resource Description for Library Catalogs (3 credits)
713 Subject Analysis in Library Catalogs (3 credits)
714 Metadata (3 credits)
716 Indexing and Abstracting (3 credits)
717 Information Architecture and Knowledge Organization (3 credits)
750 Arrangement and Description in Archives (3 credits)
719 Advanced Topics in Infomation Organization. (Subtitled) (3 credits)
990 Fieldwork in Library and Information Science Services (with a focus on information organization) (1-3 credits) OR 759 Fieldwork in Archives and Manuscripts (with a focus on information organization) (1-3 credits)
Information Technology Concentration

The Information Technology Concentration requires a minimum of 15 graduate credits from the courses listed below. planned in consultation with the student's advisor. A minimum grade of "B" (3.00 grade points) is required in all SOIS courses applied toward the concentration.

675 Information Technology and Organizations
682 Digital Libraries
685 Electronic Publishing and Web Design
714 Metadata
774 Online Information Retrieval
780 XML for Libraries
783 Information Storage and Retrieval
785 Database Management Systems for Information Professionals
786 Multimedia
787 Library Automation
788 Information Systems: Analysis and Design
789 Electronic Networking and Information Services
691 Special Topics in Information Science: (with appropriate subtitle)
891 Advanced Topics in Library and Information Science (with appropriate subtitle)
Public Library Leadership Concentration

The Public Library Leadership Concentration requires 21 credits of coursework planned in consultation with the student's advisor. Credits for the concentration count as electives for the MLIS. The courses that qualify for the concentration are as follows:

Required: Students must take the following courses
L&I Sci 736: The Public Library (3 credits)
L&I Sci 861: Seminar in Intellectual Freedom (3 credits)
L&I Sci 864 (891 topic): Public Libraries: Philosophy, Politics and Policy (3 credits)
L&I Sci 999: Independent Research (3 credits)
Electives: Students must take at least three of the following courses:
L&I Sci 520: Managing Library Collections (3 credits)
L&I Sci 524: Management of Library and Information Services (3 credits)
L&I Sci 622: Information Marketing (3 credits)
L&I Sci 661: Ethics and the Information Society (3 credits)
L&I Sci 682: Digital Libraries (3 credits)
L&I Sci 685: E-publishing and Web Design (3 credits)
L&I Sci 862: Legal Issues for Library and Information Managers (3 credits)
Proficiency Requirement in Library and Information Science

This course of study requires students to demonstrate proficiency in the field of library and information science. There are two options for completing the proficiency requirement: passing a comprehensive examination or completing and successfully defending a thesis.

Comprehensive Examination

Students choosing the comprehensive examination option must successfully pass a written comprehensive examination. A student who fails the examination the first time may repeat it once. However, a student who fails the examination may not select the thesis option.

Thesis Option

Students choosing the thesis option must take at least three credits of thesis coursework in addition to the 36 credits required for the comprehensive examination option, making the minimum credits required for the thesis option 39 credits. However, only 3 credits of thesis coursework may count towards the total degree credit requirement of 39. Those who already have a graduate degree must complete a minimum of 33 credits for this option.

Students who choose the thesis option in the coordinated master's degree programs also need to take an additional 3 credits of thesis coursework. Thus, while total degree credits vary among the coordinated master's programs, the Master of Library and Information Science component of each requires 33 credits of SOIS course work, three of which would be taken as thesis credit. Students pursuing thesis options in both programs will be required to fulfill each program's thesis requirement and complete two separate theses.

Students in the thesis option also must take a minimum of three credits of research methods. More may be required by individual circumstances, but only the first three credits may count toward degree credit requirements. Either 540-890, Research Methods in Library and Information Science, or a comparable course chosen in consultation with the major professor, can contribute towards satisfaction of this requirement. Students must complete the five core courses in addition to the research methods requirement before defense of the thesis proposal can occur.

Students must register for a variable credit thesis research course L&I Sci 540-898: Master's Thesis (1-3 credits), during every semester of thesis work.

Students may select the thesis option at any point in their course of study, but are encouraged to make this decision and form their thesis committee as early as possible to avoid the necessity of taking additional coursework. The faculty advisor assigned to each student upon admission may serve as the student's thesis advisor, but is not required to do so. It is the student's responsibility to enter into a mutually agreed upon advising relationship with a thesis advisor in SOIS, who then serves as chair of the thesis committee.

Likewise, a student may withdraw from the thesis option and pursue the comprehensive examination option; however, the student would need to meet the registration and other requirements for the comprehensive examination set forth in SOIS policies and procedures as published in the SOIS Bulletin.

Students must pass an oral examination in defense of the thesis. The thesis defense may be repeated once.

Time Limit

Students in the 36-credit program must complete all degree requirements within seven years of initial enrollment. Students in the 30-credit program must complete all degree requirements within five years of initial enrollment.

Library Media Certification Programs

REQUIREMENTS: 902 License

The following SOIS courses are required for Library Media Certification in Wisconsin.

Information Studies
501 Foundations of Library and Information Science
511 Organization of Information
520 Managing Library Collections
571 Information Access and Retrieval
591 Research in Library and Information Science
642 School Library Media Programs and Resources
644 School Library Practicum
645 Library Materials for Children
646 Library Materials for Young Adults
691 Spec Topics: Information Literacy Instruction
711 Cataloging & Classification
745 Library Services for Children and Young Adults
Choose 3+ credits in the following technology courses to meet standard:
  670 Production and Utilization of Instructional Technology
  685 Electronic Publishing and Web Design
  691 Spec Topics: Gaming and Information Literacy
  786 Multimedia
Curriculum & Instruction
701 Curriculum Planning (or equivalent)
Portfolio approval
Proficiency Exam (MLIS requirement)

We may only certify candidates who already hold a Wisconsin teaching license. Students in states other than Wisconsin must consult with their own licensing agencies to determine whether working with our program will meet that state's licensure requirements.

REQUIREMENTS: 91 Library Media Supervisor

Anyone entering this program must have 3 years experience as a school library media specialist and a Master's degree in library media.

Required coursework
Information Studies
776 Administration of School Library Media Systems
Administrative Leadership
702 Educational Administration: A Survey of Theory and Practice
712 Supervising Instructional Personnel
812 Educational Personnel Administration
Portfolio
Based on DPI standards for this licensure

Doctor of Philosophy in Information Studies

The Doctor of Philosophy in Information Studies prepares graduates for academic and professional careers where an in-depth knowledge of research processes and evaluation is needed. The program emphasizes the study of the representation, storage, retrieval, use, and impact of information resources on society. Graduates will contribute to the knowledge base of the discipline and will take on leadership roles as scholars and administrators in the discipline and the profession.

Admission

Students begin the Information Studies doctoral program in the fall. Applications are accepted only for the fall semester.

An applicant must meet Graduate School requirements plus these departmental requirements to be considered for admission to the program in regular status:

  • Have a cumulative GPA in course work for the Master's degree of at least 3.5 and an undergraduate GPA of 3.0. Applicants possessing a Master of Library and Information Science (or an equivalent degree) are preferred. Applicants with a master's degree in an allied discipline are encouraged to apply, but must complete the four required courses of the MLIS program in addition to the regular course requirements.
  • Submit verbal and quantitative scores for the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) taken within the past five years.
  • Submit three letters of recommendation from qualified persons who can attest to the applicant's aptitude for doctoral study. At least one letter must be from an academic.
  • Submit a writing sample that demonstrates the applicant's analytical and critical thinking skills. This may take the form of a published research paper, term paper from a previous graduate program, or earlier completed thesis.
  • Applicants are encouraged to bring at least two years of relevant professional experience prior to entering the Ph.D. program.

Applicants lacking the requisite GPA or academic area may be considered for admission on probation, and may be required to complete preparatory coursework.

Major Professor as Advisor

Unless a student specifically requests a particular faculty member, all doctoral students initially are assigned an "interim" advisor. After the completion of 12 credits, a student is required to designate a faculty member from an approved list of major professors with specialized interests compatible with those of the student to act as the major professor. The major professor is expected to assist the student in planning the remainder of the program of studies, chair the student's preliminary examination committee, supervise the completion of the Ph.D. dissertation, and conduct the dissertation defense meeting. All students should consult the program handbook for additional details on school policies and procedures.

Residence

The student must meet minimum Graduate School residence requirements of one continuous academic year of full-time graduate studies at UWM. This can be satisfied by completing at least 8 graduate credits in each of two consecutive semesters, or 6 or more graduate credits in each of three consecutive semesters, exclusive of summer sessions. Residence credit cannot be earned at the master's level.

Doctoral Program Coursework

Students will need to complete a minimum of 30 credits of approved coursework at the 700-level or higher.

Standard Graduate School minimum and maximum credit loads apply (see http://www.graduateschool.uwm.edu/students/policies/). Full-time students are discouraged from taking more than 9 credits per semester.

Students, along with their major professor, should develop a plan for coursework that will prepare the student to carry out research in their areas of interest. Although an identified dissertation topic is not required upon entry to the program, students should begin to formulate ideas for potential topics as soon as possible thereafter.

Preparatory Coursework (when required)

Students admitted into the program without a MLIS degree or equivalent will be required to complete some or all of the four core courses of the MLIS program (501, 511, 571, 591) prior to (or possibly concurrent with) undertaking any doctoral courses. These courses will not count towards the Ph.D. degree requirements.

In addition, some doctoral courses may require students to first complete lower level courses at the undergraduate/graduate level as deemed necessary by the student’s major professor. Again, these courses will not count towards the degree requirements. It is strongly recommended that students consult closely with their major professor or the program director upon entry into the program to plan a strategy for course completion in each area.

Foundation Courses in Information Studies (6 credits)

All students must complete the following required courses: Current Issues in Information Studies (3 credits), which surveys the key contemporary research issues in Information Studies; and Theoretical Foundations in Information Studies (3 credits), which introduces students to fundamental theoretical frameworks and models applicable to the interpretation and critical analysis of issues within Information Studies.

Barring exceptional circumstances, these courses will be taken during the student’s first or second semester in the program.

Research Methods and Design (9 credits)

All students are required to complete a minimum of 9 credits in research methods at the 700-level or higher. A minimum of 3 credits each must be taken in quantitative and qualitative methods. It is expected that all students will fulfill these requirements by completing L&I SCI 903 (Qualitative Research Methods in Information Studies) and L&I SCI 904 (Quantitative Research Methods in Information Studies). In exceptional cases, and with the approval of the major professor, a student may satisfy these research methods requirements through courses offered in other campus units. A minimum of 3 additional credits in approved research methods coursework is required. The particular focus of these 3 credits will be guided by the student’s planned research areas and may include coursework in research design, qualitative, quantitative, or other research methods. Additional coursework may be required at the discretion of the major professor.

Specialized area (12 credits)

Students must complete a minimum of 12 credits of coursework related to the specialized area(s) of their dissertation topics. Specific courses must be approved by the major professor. These coursework requirements may be met through approved existing graduate courses within SOIS, advanced special topics classes offered within SOIS at the 700-level or higher, independent research (L&I SCI 999), or courses offered outside of SOIS if approved by the major professor and the director of the Ph.D. program.

Elective courses (3 credits)

Students may take 3 additional credits of electives upon the approval of the major professor. These credits may be selected from either within or outside of SOIS courses.

Preliminary Examinations / Preparatory Essays

Students will be required to complete the doctoral preparatory essays towards the end of their coursework. The purpose of the essays will be to demonstrate the student's mastery of coursework and relevant subject matter and the student's qualifications to proceed with dissertation research. The essays will consist of three areas: research methods, the major area, and the minor area. The essays will represent non-credit research papers based on topics assigned by the student's doctoral committee, which will consist of at least three members, including one representing the student's minor. The timeline for completion of the essays will be at the committee's discretion. Based on the committee's assessment of the essays, students will be recommended for advancement toward the Ph.D. or academic dismissal from the program. If the essay results are found to be unsatisfactory, the student will have one opportunity to repeat the essay in a future semester after conferral with the major professor on how to prepare for the next attempt.

The preparatory essays must be successfully completed within four years of initial enrollment.

Dissertation Proposal

A doctoral committee of five faculty members will be in place by the time the student undertakes her/his dissertation proposal. The committee will consist of three members from the School of Information Studies, a faculty member in an allied area from outside the School, and a fifth member who may come from SOIS or another discipline. All doctoral committees shall be chaired by a major professor from the SOIS graduate faculty. Approval of the dissertation proposal, which ordinarily should occur within two semesters after successfully passing the preparatory essays, allows a student to proceed towards completion of the dissertation.

Dissertation

The candidate must write a dissertation which demonstrates her/his ability to formulate a research topic and pursue independent and original investigation that contributes to the knowledge base of the field.

Dissertation Defense

After submission of a reading copy of the dissertation to the student's doctoral committee, the candidate and the major professor will schedule a committee meeting for the purpose of undertaking an oral defense of the dissertation work by the candidate. At the conclusion of the candidate's oral remarks, the dissertation committee will vote on passing the candidate's dissertation work. A majority of the committee must vote to approve the dissertation and recommend granting of the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Approval of the dissertation by the student's doctoral committee satisfies a final requirement for the Ph.D. degree in Information Studies from the UWM-SOIS.

Time Limit

All components of the Ph.D. program must be completed within seven years of matriculation.

Additional Information for Doctoral Students

For additional information on policies and procedures for doctoral students, please see the Graduate School Doctoral Requirements page.

Courses — Information Studies

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Courses numbered 300-699 are Undergraduate/Graduate. Courses numbered 700 and above are Graduate only.

425 (L&I Sci480) Books, Paper, and Their Preservation. 1 cr. U/G.
History, theory, and practical application of conservation solutions currently practiced by professional conservators. Prereq: jr st.
465 (L&I Sci 475) Legal Aspects of Information Products and Services. 3 cr. U/G.
Introduction to legal environment surrounding development and use of information products and services, including intellectual property, and issues specific to internet and other digital mediums. Prereq: jr st.
497 Study Abroad: (Subtitled). 1-12 cr. U/G.
Designed to enroll students in UWM sponsored program before course work levels, content, and credits are determined and/or in specially prepared program course work. Retakable w/chg in topic. Prereq: jr st; acceptance for Study Abroad Prog.
501 Foundations of Library and Information Science. 3 cr. U/G.
Historical introduction to library and information science (LIS); outline of the role of information agencies in disemminating knowledge to users; overview of research in LIS. Prereq: jr st.
511 (L&I Sci 531) Organization of Information. 3 cr. U/G.
Introduction to basic concepts in the theoretical, practical, and technological aspects of information organization. Not open for cr to students with cr in InfoSt(L&I Sci) 530. Prereq: jr st.
520 Managing Library Collections. 3 cr. U/G.
Theory and practice of collection management across formats including selection tools and criteria, acquisition and evaluation of collections, deselection, preservation, and other collection development topics. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P) or cons instr.
521 Introduction to Reference Services and Resources. 3 cr. U/G.
An investigation into reference services, reference interviews, and organization, including critical examination of basic reference sources. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P), 571(P); or cons instr.
524 (L&I Sci 540) Management of Libraries and Information Services. 3 cr. U/G.
The library/information center as a service organization. Management of the library/information center: planning, budgeting, decision making, leadership styles, motivation, communication, personnel and financial management. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt( L&I Sci) 501(P); or cons instr.
571 Information Access and Retrieval. 3 cr. U/G.
An overview of the concepts and theory related to information retrieval. Prereq: jr st.
591 Introduction to Research Methods in Library and Information Science. 3 cr. U/G.
An introduction to basic research concepts, methods, and evaluation in library and information science, and applications of research in the information professions. Prereq: jr st.
603 (L&I Sci 680) History of Books and Printing. 3 cr. U/G.
The people, ideas, and events in the history of bookmaking from ancient times to the 1890's. Prereq: jr st.
619 Topics in Information Organization: (Subtitled). 1-3 cr. U/G.
Study of particular topics in Information Organization. Specific topics announced in Schedule of Classes each time course is offered. May be repeated with change in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st & InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(P); or cons instr.
622 Information Marketing. 3 cr. U/G.
Concepts and principles of marketing and strategic planning as they apply to libraries and information agencies; case studies in information brokering and repackaging. Prereq: jr st.
627 (L&I Sci 686) Music Librarianship. 3 cr. U/G.
Examination of materials used in obtaining music information and in establishing bibliographic control. Emphasis on reference, library instruction, collection management, and organization of music collections. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P), 571(P); or cons instr.
632 Microcomputers for Information Resources Management: 3 cr. U/G.
Use and applications of microcomputers in various library and information management functions. Requires 1-2 hrs of weekly laboratory time. Prereq: jr st & cons instr.
642 School Library Media Programs and Resources. 3 cr. U/G.
A study of the functions of the school library media center as an educational component including service, administration, collection development and utilization of materials. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P); 520(P); 571(P); or cons instr.
644 (L&I Sci 690) School Library Practicum. 1-3 cr. U/G.
Field experience of 210 hours in elementary and secondary school library media services under faculty and field supervisor guidance. Prereq: jr st; school library media certification program students only; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P), 520(P), 571(P) & 642(672)(C); or cons instr.
645 (L&I Sci 648) Library Materials for Children. 3 cr. U/G.
Introduction to print and media resources available in library collections; selection procedures, evaluation criteria, access and promotion of use of materials. Prereq: jr st.
646 (L&I Sci 658) Library Materials for Young Adults. 3 cr. U/G.
Criteria for evaluation and selection of materials for young adults, emphasizing current resources, techniques of reading guidance and book talks. Prereq: jr st.
650 An Introduction to Modern Archives Administration. 3 cr. U/G.
An introduction to the archives profession, archives administration, main uses of primary sources in academic research, and archival issues regarding the Internet and other technologies. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt 501(C).
655 (L&I Sci 615) Information and Records Management: 3 cr. U/G.
Principles and practices of information and records management: organizational information needs, retention, schedules, vital records protection, micrographics, records centers and records management policy. Prereq: jr st.
656 Electronic Documents and Records Management. 3 cr. U/G.
Advanced concepts, unique challenges, and on-going issues of electronic records management, including automated systems, information lifecycle management, access, legality, media stability, migration, and long-term preservation. Counts as repeat of InfoSt(L&I Sci) 691 w/same topic. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 655(P) or cons instr.
660 (L&I Sci 625) Information Policy. 3 cr. U/G.
Explore various aspects of information policy including privacy, intellectual property, and intellectual freedom; covers applicable methodologies. Prereq: jr st.
661 (L&I Sci 620) Ethics and the Information Society. 3 cr. U/G.
Ethical traditions, concepts, and principles for the information professions in the global information society; ethical implications of information technologies. Counts as a repeat of L&I Sci 691 with similar topic/title. Prereq: jr st & InfoSt(L&I Sci) 110(P); 501(P) or cons instr.
670 Instructional Technologies. 3 cr. U/G.
Traditional technologies, multimedia formats, and computer-based technologies for instructional purposes. No degree cr for students with cr in InfoSt(L&I Sci) 668 or 669. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 632(P).
674 The Search Engine Society. 3 cr. U/G.
Critical examination of the role of search engines in contemporary society, including impact on information organization and retrieval, information institutions, information policy, law, and ethics. Counts as repeat of InfoSt(L&I Sci) 691 w/similar topic. Prereq: jr st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P) or cons instr.
675 Information Technology and Organizations. 3 cr. U/G.
Topical seminar, exploring the relationship between information technology (IT) culture, organizations and the organization of work, cultures, subcultures; sociology of IT work; enterprise systems; knowledge management; data mining and IT careers. Prereq: jr st.
682 (L&I Sci 635) Digital Libraries. 3 cr. U/G.
Concepts and technologies for development of digital libraries. Topics include tools for multimedia digitization, organization of digital resources, and evaluation of digital libraries and gateways. Prereq: jr st & InfoSt(L&I Sci) 110(P); 501(P); or cons instr.
685 Electronic Publishing and Web Design. 3 cr. U/G.
An introduction to principles of visual communications related to electronic media with emphasis on website development, electronic documents, and production and dissemination of electronic information. Counts as repeat of InfoSt(L&I Sci) 691 w/similar topic. Prereq: jr st.
691 Special Topics in Information Science: (Subtitled). 1-3 cr. U/G.
An exploration of current topics in information science. Specific topics and any additional prerequisites will be announced in Schedule of Classes each time course is offered. May be retaken with change in topic to max of 9 cr. Prereq: jr st; cons instr.
711 (L&I Sci 631) Cataloging and Classification. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to principles and practices of resource description, subject cataloging, and classification in a variety of library settings. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P) or cons instr
712 Resource Description for Library Catalogs. 3 cr. G.
Application of standards and rules to the construction of tools for information retrieval, primarily digital resources and catalogs in library and information environments. Prereq: grad st; L&I Sci 711(P) or cons instr
713 Subject Analysis in Library Catalogs. 3 cr. G.
Theories, principles, and major methods of subject cataloging and classification as practiced in interactive online environments. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 711(P) or cons instr
714 Metadata. 3 cr. G.
Principles and application of metadata for networked information resource organization, representation, retrieval, and interoperability using a variety of schemes; focus on cultural heritage digital repositories. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P)
715 (effective 01/26/2015) Music Cataloging. 3 cr. G.
Bibliographic control of music materials. Descriptive cataloging, authority control, subject analysis and classification of music materials. Structure of music catalogs and requirements for effective retrieval. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt 511(P)
716 (L&I Sci 630) (effective 09/02/2015) Thesaurus Construction. 3 cr. G.
Overview of thesaurus construction, vocabulary control and ontology. Design and construction of thesauri, including domain analysis, vocabulary extraction, concept clustering, ordering, structural relations, thesaurus maintenance. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P), 591(P).
716 (L&I Sci 630) Indexing and Abstracting. 3 cr. G.
Fundamental principles, practices and procedures of indexing and abstracting. Focus on document analysis, vocabulary control, thesaurus construction, and design and evaluation of indexing systems. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P), 591(P).
717 (effective 09/02/2015) Information Architecture. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to information architecture and user experience design, focusing on designing user-centered organization, labeling, navigation, search, metadata, and knowledge organization systems for websites. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P).
717 Information Architecture and Knowledge Organization. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of information architecture, with focus on designing user-centered organization, labeling, navigation, search, metadata, and knowledge organization systems for web sites. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(P).
719 Advanced Topics in Information Organization. (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Advanced study of a particular topic in Information Organization. May be repeated w/ chg in topic to 9 cr. max. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(P) or cons instr.
734 (L&I Sci 751) Library Services and Resources for Adults. 3 cr. G.
Introduction to the wide range of services and materials with which the library meets the needs of adult patrons. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 520(C), 571(P); or cons instr
735 (L&I Sci 770) The Academic Library. 3 cr. G.
Administration of the college and university library, including a study of budgets, personnel, building and collections requirements, and cooperative programs. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(C); 511(531)(P); 520(C); 524(540)(R); & 571(C); or cons instr
736 (L&I Sci 771) The Public Library. 3 cr. G.
Overview of issues and functions of american public libraries; including trends in governance, program planning and evaluation, community analysis, alternative funding, library use and users. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(C); 511(531)(P); 520(C); 524(540)(P); 571(C); or cons instr.
737 (L&I Sci 772) The Special Library and Information Center. 3 cr. G.
The role of the information center in specialized environments, including functions, service responsibilities, programs, trends, and problems and issues unique to a special library environment. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(C); 511(531)(P); 520(P); 524(540)(P); 571(P); or cons instr
738 (L&I Sci 470) Legal Information Sources and Services. 3 cr. G.
A study of legal sources of federal and Wisconsin law including the use of law finders, statutes, cases and digests. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 571(P)
739 Digital Information Services. 3 cr. G.
Examination of major issues involved in digital information services. Comparison of differences and similarities between digital and face-to-face services, evaluation of DIS and current trends. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 682(P); 510(P); & 571(P).
740 (effective 01/26/2015) Information Literacy Instruction. 3 cr. G.
Concepts and principles involed in teaching information literacy; emphasis on organizing and developing courses and individual sessions. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P)
741 Multicultural Children's Literature. 3 cr. G.
Exploration of children's literature representing racialized groups in the United States; discussion will focus on evaluating and selecting material. Counts as repeat of 691 w/ same topic. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 645(P) or equivalent; or cons instr.
745 (L&I Sci 757) Library Services for Children and Young Adults. 3 cr. G.
A foundation for developing, planning, and programming library services to meet the needs and interests of children and young adults; attention to content and evaluation of literature for these groups. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 645(P) or 646(C); or cons instr
746 (L&I Sci 776) Administration of School Library Media Systems. 3 cr. G.
Organizational and managerial aspects of administering school library media systems. Includes study of organizational structures, personnel, budgetary problems, programs and services, and research in the field. Prereq: grad st & InfoSt(L&I Sci) 642(P); or cons instr
750 (L&I Sci 779) Arrangement and Description in Archives. 3 cr. G.
Development of the intellectual framework and critical evaluation skills necessary for the arrangement and description of archival collections. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 650(681)(C) or cons instr.
752 (L&I Sci 778) Archival Outreach: Programs and Services. 3 cr. G.
An introduction to archival outreach and reference services for sustaining an archival program committed to public service. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 650(681)(C) or cons instr.
753 Preserving Information Media. 3 cr. G.
Examines all aspects of archival preservation of multiple media formats. Includes discussions of preservation practice, policy and programming in an archives. InfoSt(L&I Sci) 791 with similar topic counts as repeat of 753. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 650(P) or cons instr.
759 (L&I Sci 790) Fieldwork in Archives and Manuscripts. 1-3 cr. G.
Field experience of 50 to 150 hours in an archives or manuscript repository under faculty and field supervisor guidance. Student must also complete a supervised field project. May be repeated for total of 3 cr. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 571(P), 524(540)(P); 650(681)(P) or History 775(P); or cons instr.
761 Information Privacy. 3 cr. G.
Graduate seminar on information privacy, undertaking a multi-faceted, multi-disciplinary examination of the relationships between information, technology, law and privacy in our digital society. Counts as repeat of 763 w/similar topic. Prereq: grad st
763 Topics in Information Policy. (Subtitled). 1-3 cr. G.
An array of coursework specifically related to the social, ethical, economic, legal, and philosophical aspects of information. May be repeated w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st
774 Online Information Retrieval. 3 cr. G.
Study of the organizational, operational and developmental aspects of on-line database services, including an overview of the on-line community. Students must spend one hour per week in an 0n-line laboratory session. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P); 571(P); 530 or 511(531)(P); cons instr
780 XML for Libraries. 3 cr. G.
Overview of general markup languages; concepts and components of extensible markup language, and the future of publishing and libraries. Prereq: grad st
783 (L&I Sci 671) Information Storage and Retrieval. 3 cr. G.
Fundamental analysis and design principles and theories used in systems for the storage, processing, and retrieval of information. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 571(P) or cons instr.
785 (L&I Sci 742) Database Managment Systems for Information Professionals. 3 cr. G.
Study of microcomputer data base management software (DBMS) and information retrieval (IR) systems and their potential applications for information services. Prereq: grad st
786 Multimedia. 3 cr. G.
Multimedia and its applications in information systems and instructional environments. Students develop essential skills in the evaluation, creation, editing, and rendering of multimedia. Counts as repeat of InfoSt(L&I Sci) 891 w/ same topic. Prereq: grad st; cons instr
787 (L&I Sci 781) Library Automation. 3 cr. G.
The current status of automation and network activities among libraries, including an exploration of problems and prospects. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 511(531)(C) or cons instr
788 (L&I Sci 782) Information Systems: Analysis and Design. 3 cr. G.
Analysis, design, and evaluation of information systems. The information system mission, goals and objectives are used to develop measures for judging system effectiveness and efficiency. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P) or cons instr
789 (L&I Sci 710) Electronic Networking and Information Services: 3 cr. G.
Outlines basic concepts of communication technology, electronic networking, and available information resources and services for information professionals. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 510(P), 571(P) or cons instr.
791 Topics in Library and Information Science: (Subtitled). 1-3 cr. G.
Graduate level treatment of current topics in library and information science. Specific topic and any additional prerequisites announced in Schedule of Classes each time course is offered. May be repeated w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt 501(P) or cons instr
821 (L&I Sci 876) Seminar in Library Administration. 3 cr. G.
Selected problems of administration in all types of libraries. Topics may include areas such as library financial planning, staffing or facilities management. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 520(C), 524(540)(P), 571(C), or cons instr.
823 (L&I Sci 840) Seminar in International and Multicultural Information Services. 3 cr. G.
Implications of global and multicultural trends for information services. Creation, diffusion and use of information in cross-cultural settings. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P), 524(540)(P), or cons instr.
831 (L&I Sci 811) Information Sources and Services in the Social Sciences and Humanities: 3 cr. G.
A study of the reference literature of the social sciences and humanities; the structure of the literature and organizations in each field. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 571(P).
832 (L&I Sci 814) Government Information Sources and Services. 3 cr. G.
Availability, selection, and use of federal, state, and local documents; international organization documents; or documents of selected foreign governments. Prereq: grad st & InfoSt(L&I Sci) 571(P).
833 (L&I Sci 816) Business Information Sources and Services. 3 cr. G.
Information services and basic sources in business and competitive intelligence. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 571(P).
834 (L&I Sci 813) Information Sources and Services in Science and Technology. 3 cr. G.
A study of the reference literature of science and technology; the structure of the literature; and services of the various information sources in those fields. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 571(P).
835 (L&I Sci 817) Information Sources and Services in the Health Sciences. 3 cr. G.
A survey of the basic sources used to locate information in the fields of medicine, nursing, allied health and health care administration, along with an introduction to the traditional & innovative services offered by health science libraries. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 571(P)
845 (L&I Sci 801) Doctoral Seminar: Issues in Educational and Media Technology. 3 cr. G.
Interdisciplinary overview of research and theories in educational and media technology. Emphasizes cognitive bases of knowledge transfer and implications for instructional systems design and technology. Prereq: grad st; cons instr; Educ 701(P)
850 (L&I Sci 758) Seminar in Modern Archives Administration. 3 cr. G.
In-depth exploration of several aspects of archival work through extensive readings, discussions, practical exercises and a major seminar paper. Counts as repeat of Hist 777. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 650(681)(P) or cons instr.
861 (L&I Sci 820) Seminar in Intellectual Freedom. 3 cr. G.
Principles and practices of intellectual freedom, as related to the information professions. Emphasizes, but is not limited to, current issues in the u.s. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 520(P) or cons instr.
862 (L&I Sci 825) Legal Issues for Library and Information Managers. 3 cr. G.
Legal issues arising in various library settings, including access rights, privacy and confidentiality, copyright, intellectual freedom and information liability and malpractice. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P) or cons instr
863 (effective 01/26/2015) Feminism, Librarianship, and Information. 3 cr. G.
The nature of librarianship as a profession, issues related to information and technology, and practices of information services from gendered perspectives using applicable feminist theories. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt 501(P); InfoSt 591(P)
888 Candidate for Degree: 0 cr. G.
Available for graduate students who must meet minimum credit load requirement. Fee assessed for 1 cr. Prereq: grad st.
890 Advanced Research Methods in Information Studies. 3 cr. G.
Advanced treatment of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and their applications in information studies. Practice in developing, analyzing and appraising examples of research. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P), 511(531)(C), 571(C), 591(P), or cons instr.
891 Advanced Topics in Library and Information Science: (Subtitled). 1-3 cr. G.
Seminar in advanced current topics in library and information science. Specific topics and any additional prerequisites announced in schedule of classes each time course is offered. May be repeated with change in topic to max of 9 cr. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
898 Master's Thesis. 1-3 cr. G.
Research and writing in consultation with SOIS thesis advisor for M.L.I.S. candidates pursuing the Thesis Option. May be repeated until completion and defense of the thesis. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 890(P) or equiv; cons of thesis advisor.
899 Master's Independent Study. 3 cr. G.
Advanced study under faculty guidance, on a special aspect of library and information services. Regular faculty consultation and written report(s) required. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P), 511(531)(P), 571(P), 591(P), or cons instr. Max of 6 cr between InfoSt(L&I Sci) 899 and 999 may count toward the MLIS.
901 Current Issues in Information Studies. 3 cr. G.
Current topical issues in information studies, socializes doctoral students to research culture, and analyzes current research topics in the field. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P), 511(P), 571(P), 591(P), or cons instr
902 Theoretical Foundations in Information Studies. 3 cr. G.
This doctoral seminar introduces students to a range of fundamental theoretical foundations and models relevant to information studies. Prereq: grad st (doctoral st) or cons instr.
903 Qualitative Research Methods. 3 cr. G.
Qualitative research design, data collection, data analysis tools and techniques as well as theory building in the context of information study research. Prereq: grad st (doctoral st) or cons instr.
904 Quantitative Research Methods. 3 cr. G.
Quantitative research designs, data process and analysis, inferential statistical methods and theories, applications in information studies, and evaluation of quantitative research studies. Prereq: grad st (doctoral st) or cons instr.
910 Doctoral Seminar in the Organization of Information. 3 cr. G.
In-depth and critical study of the historical, philosophical, theoretical, and methodological foundation of the organization of information. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 901(P), at least six grad credits in the organization of information, or cons instr.
960 Doctoral Seminar in Information Policy. 3 cr. G.
Examination of the conceptual, institutional, and practical foundations of information policy, law, and ethics. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 660(P), 661(P), 862(P), 901(P), or cons instr.
970 Doctoral Seminar in Information Retrieval. 3 cr. G.
Advanced research concepts, methods, and applications for information retrieval (IR) and its evaluation, and current topics of research interest to the IR community. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 671(P), 901(P), or cons instr
990 Fieldwork in Library and Information Science Services. 1-3 cr. G.
Fieldwork experience of 50 to 150 hours under faculty and field supervisor guidance. Student must also complete a supervised field project. May be repeated to max of 6 cr with cons adviser. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P), 511(531)(P), 571(P); cons instr.
998 Doctoral Dissertation. 1-3 cr. G.
Doctoral dissertation research and advisement for information studies PhD candidates and PhD candidates with an emphasis in library and information science. Prereq: doctoral candidacy & cons doctoral advisor.
999 Independent Research. 1-3 cr. G.
Primary research under faculty guidance, on a special aspect of library and information services. Regular faculty consultation and written research report(s) required. Carries 3 cr limit for MLIS; may be repeated to 6 cr max for advanced certificate students. Prereq: grad st; InfoSt(L&I Sci) 501(P), 511(531)(P), 571(P), 591(P), or cons instr.

Courses — Library and Information Science

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Courses numbered 300-699 are Undergraduate/Graduate. Courses numbered 700 and above are Graduate only.

864 Public Libraries: Philosophy, Policy, Politics. 3 cr. G.
Explores advanced concepts of the public library as a political institution in the public sphere. Includes investigations of legislative foundations, funding, governance and social engagement. Counts as repeat of L&I Sci 891 w/ the same topic. Prereq: grad st; L&I Sci 501(P), 591(P), 736(P) or cons instr

Page last updated on: 12/18/2014