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E-mail: histgrad@uwm.edu

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History

School/College: College of Letters and Science

Degrees Conferred:

  • M.A. in History
  • Ph.D. in History

Contents

Overview

The Department of History offers M.A. and Ph.D. programs that prepare students for careers in teaching, in historical research, and in archives, historical agencies, museums, libraries and government. The Department offers a wide array of geographically, chronologically and thematically defined courses.

At the master's level, the Department offers four options: (a) a general degree in History; (b) a specialization in Public History for those interested in areas such as museum work, archival administration and historic preservation; (c) a coordinated Master of Arts/Master of Library and Information Science degree program; (d) a specialization in Urban Historical Studies for students who intend to pursue a Ph.D. in Urban Studies or in Urban History.

At the doctoral level, the Department offers the PhD in History.

The Department also participates in the interdisciplinary master's and doctoral programs in Urban Studies. For more information, see the Urban Studies page.

Graduate Faculty

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Distinguished Professors
Anderson, Margo J., Ph.D., Rutgers University
Hoeveler, J. David, Jr., Ph.D., University of Illinois
Wiesner-Hanks, Merry E., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Professors
Carlin, Martha, Ph.D., University of Toronto
Howland, Douglas, Ph.D., University of Chicago
Jeansonne, Glen, Ph.D., Florida State University
Levine, Marc V., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Pease, Neal H., Ph.D., Yale University, Chair
Pycior, Helena M., Ph.D., Cornell University
Ruggiero, Kristin, Ph.D., Indiana University
Associate Professors
Alinder, Jasmine, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Amster, Ellen, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Austin, Joe, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Buff, Rachel, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Carter, Greg, Ph.D., University of Texas
Chu, Winson, Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley
Eichner, Carolyn, Ph.D., University of California-Los Angeles
Galvao-Sobrinho, Carlos, Ph.D., Yale University
McBride, Genevieve, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Madison
McGuinness, Aims, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Miller, Cary, Ph.D., University of North Carolina
Renda, Lex, Ph.D., University of Virginia
Rodriguez, Joseph A., Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley
Seligman, Amanda, Ph.D., Northwestern University
Silverman, Lisa, Ph.D., Yale University
Smith, Robert, Ph.D., Bowling Green State University
Vang, Chia, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Assistant Professors
DiValerio, David, Ph.D., University of Virginia
Evans, Christine, Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley
Filippello, Marcus Ph.D., University of California-Davis
Kim, Nan, Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley
Paugh, Katherine, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Master of Arts in History

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Admission

To be considered for admission, an applicant must meet Graduate School requirements plus these departmental requirements:

  1. An undergraduate minor or 18 credits in history or equivalent preparation.
  2. Two letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant's scholastic achievement and potential.
  3. A sample of the applicant's written work that demonstrates his or her ability to conduct historical research and/or the ability to analyze critically the work of others.
  4. Scores on the Graduate Record Examination (General Test only).

Please see http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/history/graduate/gradapply.cfm for information on the History Department application.

Applicants may be admitted with course deficiencies provided that the deficiencies amount to no more than two courses. The student is expected to satisfy deficiency requirements within three enrolled semesters. The deficiencies are monitored by the Graduate School and the individual graduate program unit. No course credits earned in making up deficiencies may be counted toward the degree.

Advising

The Director of Graduate Studies provides initial advising for students in selecting courses and assists in selecting a Major Professor for long-term advising; the Director may assign a provisional graduate advisor before students select a Major Professor. Students are required to consult periodically with, and have their schedules approved by, the Director of Graduate Studies, the provisional advisor, or the Major Professor. The Major Professor normally serves as the chair of the student's academic review and supervises either the writing of the student's thesis or the student's reading for the comprehensive exam.

General History Option A: Thesis Option
Credits and Courses

Students who initially enroll before Fall 2014:
Minimum degree requirement is 24 graduate credits, at least 21 of which must be taken in History. Required credit distribution: 3 credits in 712 (Historiography and Theory of History) or 713 (Historical Research Methods); 6 credits in two colloquia; 6 credits in two seminars; 6 credits for thesis; remaining 3 credits in electives selected in consultation with the student's advisor. Students may take 3 credits of either Hist 716 (Professional and Pedagogical Issues in History) or Hist 717 (History and the New Media) as a substitute for 3 credits in one colloquium.

Students who initially enroll for Fall 2014 or later:
Minimum degree requirement is 30 graduate credits, at least 24 of which must be taken in History. Required credit distribution: 3 credits in 712 (Historiography and Theory of History) or 713 (Historical Research Methods); 6 credits in two colloquia; 6 credits in two seminars; 6 credits for thesis; remaining 9 credits in electives selected in consultation with the student's advisor. Students may take 3 credits of either Hist 716 (Professional and Pedagogical Issues in History) or Hist 717 (History and the New Media) as a substitute for 3 credits in one colloquium.

Academic Review and Thesis Prospectus

Within the first semester after completing 9 credits (including two of the following courses: 712, 713, a colloquium and/or seminar), Option A students are subject to an academic review. The Review is a one- to two-hour meeting involving the student, the student's Major Professor and two other members of the History Graduate Faculty who will serve as secondary readers of the student's thesis. With the assistance of his or her Major Professor, the student must prepare a thesis prospectus in advance of the Review. The Review involves an evaluation of the student's academic progress in master's course work, two unrevised course papers, and the thesis prospectus.

Thesis

The student must write an acceptable thesis.

Thesis Defense

The student must pass an oral examination in defense of the thesis.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within five years of initial enrollment.

General History Option B: Non-Thesis Option
Credits and Courses

Students who initially enroll before Fall 2014:
Minimum degree requirement is 24 graduate credits, 18 of which must be taken in History. Required credit distribution: 3 credits in 712 (Historiography and Theory of History) or 713 (Historical Research Methods); 6 credits in two colloquia (800 numbers); 6 credits in two seminars (900 numbers); 9 credits in electives selected in consultation with the student's advisor. Students may take 3 credits of either Hist 716 (Professional and Pedagogical Issues in History) or Hist 717 (History and the New Media) as a substitute for 3 credits in one colloquium.

Students who initially enroll for Fall 2014 or later:
Minimum degree requirement is 30 graduate credits, 24 of which must be taken in History. Required credit distribution: 3 credits in 712 (Historiography and Theory of History) or 713 (Historical Research Methods); 6 credits in two colloquia (800 numbers); 6 credits in two seminars (900 numbers); 15 credits in electives selected in consultation with the student's advisor. Students may take 3 credits of either Hist 716 (Professional and Pedagogical Issues in History) or Hist 717 (History and the New Media) as a substitute for 3 credits in one colloquium.

Academic Review and Comprehensive Examination Reading List

Within the first semester after completing 9 credits (including two of the following courses: 712, 713, a colloquium and/or seminar), Option B students are subject to an academic review. The Review is a one- to two-hour meeting involving the student, the student's Major Professor and two other members of the History Graduate Faculty who will serve as examiners for the student's comprehensive exam. With the assistance of his or her Major Professor, the student must prepare a reading list for the comprehensive exam in advance of the Review. The Review involves an evaluation of the student's academic progress in master's course work, two unrevised course papers, and the reading list for the comprehensive exam.

Thesis

Not required.

Comprehensive Examination

The student must pass a written and oral comprehensive examination.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within five years of initial enrollment

Public History Specialization
Credits and Courses

Minimum degree requirement is 36 graduate credits, 18 of which must be taken in general history courses, the remaining 18 in public history courses. The 18 credits in general history must be distributed in the following way: 6 credits in colloquia, 6 credits in seminars, 3 credits in History 715 (Research Methods in Local History), and 3 credits in electives. Students may take 3 credits of either Hist 716 (Professional and Pedagogical Issues in History) or Hist 717 (History and the New Media) as a substitute for 3 credits in one colloquium.

Of the 18 credits in public history courses, the following 9 credits are required: 3 credits in History 700 (Introduction to Public History) and either 6 credits in History 701 (Internship in Public History) or 6 thesis credits (to be taken by students in the thesis track; see tracks below). Public history students must take History 700 in the first semester of their first year. The remaining 9 credits in public history must be selected from courses that pertain to the area in which the student wishes to specialize.

Students must select from one of the following tracks: museum studies, archives, historic preservation, or thesis.

Museum Studies Track
Students in Museum Studies must account for the 3 elective credits in general history and the 9 elective credits in Public History by taking the Anthropology four-course museum sequence, Anthro 720 (History and Theory of Museums), 721 (Administration and Organization of Museums), 722 (Museum Exhibits), and 723 (Museum Curation).

Archives Track
For students interested in careers as archivists, the 9 credits of electives should be selected from the following courses:

L&I Sci 681 Introduction to Modern Archives Administration, 3 cr
L&I Sci 775 Modern Archives Administration, 3 cr
L&I Sci 777 Seminar in Modern Archves Administration, 3 cr
L&I Sci 778 Archival Outreach: Programs and Services, 3 cr
L&I Sci 779 Arrangement and Description in Archives, 3 cr
L&I Sci 790 Fieldwork in Archives and Manuscripts, 3 cr

Historic Preservation Track
For students interested in careers in historic preservation, the 9 credits of electives in public history should be selected from the following courses:

ArtHist 459 American Architecture
ArtHist 461 Early Modern Architecture in the Midwest
ArtHist 701 Colloquium in Architectural History
Arch 531 Historic Concepts of Architecture
Arch 551 American Vernacular Architecture
Arch 560 Introduction to Historic Preservation
Arch 760 History of Building Technology

Within the historic preservation track, students may elect to complete a multi-disciplinary historical preservation option. For this option, the minimum degree requirement is 48 graduate credits, 24 of which must be in history courses, with the remaining 24 selected from historic preservation courses in Art History and Architecture.

The 24 credits in history must be distributed as follows: 6 credits in colloquia, 6 credits in seminars, 3 credits in History 700 (Introduction to Public History), 3 credits in History 715 (Research Methods in Local History), and 6 credits in History 701 (Internship in Public History). Students may take 3 credits of either Hist 716 (Professional and Pedagogical Issues in History) or Hist 717 (History and the New Media) as a substitute for 3 credits in one colloquium.

Of the 24 credits in historic preservation courses, 12 credits are required:

Arch 300 Early Modern Architecture in the Midwest, 3 credits;
Arch 531 Historical Concepts of Architecture, 3 credits;
Arch 551 American Vernacular Architecture, 3 credits;
Arch 560 Introduction to Historic Preservation, 3 credits.

The remaining 12 credits must be selected from the following courses:

ArtHist 441 Early Modern Architecture in the Midwest, 3 credits;
ArtHist 459 American Architecture, 3 credits;
ArtHist 701 Colloquium in Architectural History: (Subtitle), 3 credits
Arch 533 Topics in Architectural Theory, 3 credits;
Arch 561 Measured Drawing for Architects, 3 credits;
Arch 562 Preservation Technology Laboratory, 3 credits.

Thesis Track
Students in the thesis track write a thesis in public history instead of pursuing an internship. Students are required to take 6 thesis credits instead of 6 credits in Hist 701, and they are required to take 9 credits in interdisciplinary courses in the humanities and/or social sciences that focus on culture and politics in public history instead of 9 credits in specialized professional courses.

The following are recommended interdisciplinary courses (others may be chosen with the approval of the Public History coordinators):

Anthropology
349 Seminar in Ethnography and Cultural Processes, 3 cr
803 Survey of Cultural Anthropology, 3 cr
Architecture
302 Architecture and Human Behavior, 3 cr
Art History
363 Modern Sculpture, 3 cr
458 Comparative History of Architecture and Urbanism, 3 cr
901 Problems in Art History, 3 cr
English
630 Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts, 3 cr
741 Backgrounds of Modernism II, 3 cr
741 Mass Culture, 3 cr
885 Seminar in Critical Theory, 3 cr
Film
420 Documentary Film, 3 cr
Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies
560 History of Mass Media, 3 cr
562 Media Studies and Culture, 3 cr
815 Mass Media and Cultural Studies, 3 cr
Library and Information Sciences
550 Introduction to Information Science, 3 cr
615 Information and Records Management, 3 cr
681 Using Archives, 3 cr
Political Science
789 Theory and Role of Nonprofit Organizations, 3 cr
Sociology
700 Sociological Inquiry, 3 cr
927 Seminar in Sociology of Contemporary Institutions, 3 cr
928 Seminar in Social Organization, 3 cr
Urban Studies
921 Research Methods in Urban Affairs, 3 cr

Within the first semester after completing 9 credits (including two of the following courses: Hist 700, Hist 715, a colloquium, and/or a seminar), public history students who choose to write a thesis are subject to an academic review. The review is a one- to two-hour meeting involving the student, the student's major professor, and two other members of the History Graduate Faculty who will serve as secondary readers of the student's thesis. With the assistance of his or her major professor, the student must prepare a thesis prospectus in advance of the review. The review involves an evaluation of the student's academic progress in master's course work, two unrevised course papers, and the thesis prospectus.

Internship

All internships must be approved by the Public History Coordinator and are to be supervised and evaluated by the Coordinator and the host institution. All students must write a substantial paper as a part of their internship experience.

Thesis Option for Students in Non-Thesis Tracks

A thesis is not required for students in the museum studies, archives, and historical preservation tracks, but with the approval of the Public History Coordinator these students may write a thesis in public history, which will add 6 credits to the 36-credit Public History specialization. Public History students who write a thesis are subject to the Academic Review and Thesis Prospectus requirements outlined above for the General History Option A.

Comprehensive Examination

Not required.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within seven years of initial enrollment.

Urban Historical Studies Specialization

This specialization combines historical approaches with those of the social sciences in studying urban processes, organizations, and society. It is designed to meet the needs of students who intend to enter the interdisciplinary Urban Studies Ph.D. program or a similar program after completion of the Master of Arts degree.

Coursework

The minimum degree requirement is 33 graduate credits distributed in the following manner:

  • History 712 Historiography and Theory of History or History 713 Historical Research Methods
  • History 595 The Quantitative Analysis of Historical Data
  • 6 credits in History colloquia (800 numbered courses)
  • 6 credits in History seminars (HIST 971 and one other 900 numbered course)
  • 6 credits in HIST 985 Master's Thesis Research
  • Three of the following four courses:
    • Urb Std 901 Seminar: Urban Social Structures
    • Urb Std 913 Seminar in Urban Political Process
    • Urb Std 945 The Internal Structure of the City
    • Urb Std 921 Research Methods in Urban Affairs
Thesis

A thesis is required in this specialization.

Thesis Defense

The student must pass an oral defense of the thesis.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within five years of initial enrollment.

Coordinated M.A./MLIS Program

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Students in this program concurrently pursue a Master of Arts in History and a Master of Library and Information Science degree, which are awarded simultaneously.

Credits and Courses
Students who initially enroll before Fall 2014:

Within the coordinated degree program, the minimum requirement for the M.A. in History is 24 graduate credits. Course distribution requirements are the same as those for General History Option A or Option B above, but the 3 elective credits for Option A and 6 of the elective credits for Option B can be selected from L&I Sci 681 (Introduction to Modern Archives Administration), L&I Sci 777 (Seminar in Modern Archives Administration), L&S Sci 778 (Archival Outreach: Programs and Services), L&S Sci 779 (Arrangement and Description in Archives), and L&I Sci 790 (Fieldwork in Archives and Manuscripts). These elective credits also can be used to satisfy degree requirements for the MLIS. For both Option A and Option B, at least 18 credits must be taken in History graduate courses.

Students who initially enroll for Fall 2014 or later:

Within the coordinated degree program, the minimum requirement for the M.A. in History is 30 graduate credits. Course distribution requirements are the same as those for General History Option A or Option B above, but the 3 elective credits for Option A and 6 of the elective credits for Option B can be selected from L&I Sci 681 (Introduction to Modern Archives Administration), L&I Sci 777 (Seminar in Modern Archives Administration), L&S Sci 778 (Archival Outreach: Programs and Services), L&S Sci 779 (Arrangement and Description in Archives), and L&I Sci 790 (Fieldwork in Archives and Manuscripts). These elective credits also can be used to satisfy degree requirements for the MLIS. For both Option A and Option B, at least 24 credits must be taken in History graduate courses.

Academic Review and Comprehensive Examination Reading List (Option B)

Within the first semester after completing 9 credits (including two of the following courses: 712, 713, a colloquium and/or seminar), M.A./MLIS students are subject to an academic review. The Review is a one- to two-hour meeting involving the student, the student's Major Professor, and two other members of the History Graduate Faculty who will serve as examiners for the student's comprehensive exam. With the assistance of his or her Major Professor, the student must prepare a reading list for the comprehensive exam in advance of the Review. The Review involves an evaluation of the student's academic progress in master's course work, two unrevised course papers, and the reading list for the comprehensive exam.

Comprehensive Examination

The student must pass a written and oral comprehensive examination.

Thesis (Option A)

Not required, but with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies in History, the student may substitute a thesis for the comprehensive examination requirement. M.A./MLIS students who write a thesis are subject to the Academic Review and Thesis Prospectus requirements outlined above for Option A.

Time Limit

The student must complete all requirements for the coordinated degree within seven years of initial enrollment.

Doctor of Philosophy in History

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Admission

To be considered for admission, an applicant must meet Graduate School admission requirements plus these departmental requirements:

  1. A master's degree in history or a related field
  2. Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant's intellectual achievement and potential.
  3. A sample of the applicant's written work that demonstrates his or her ability to conduct historical research and/or the ability to analyze the work of others critically.
  4. Scores of the Graduate Record Examination.

Please see http://www4.uwm.edu/letsci/history/graduate/gradapply.cfm for information on the History Department application.

Course of Study

To earn the Ph.D., a student must have accumulated at least 54 graduate credits, at least 30 of them taken at the post-master's level. (Precise numbers of credits and actual course requirements while in Ph.D. status will be determined after a review of the applicant's previous coursework.) Doctoral students may not accumulate more than 6 credits in U/G courses, nor more than 6 credits in independent study without the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies. Of the 54 credits, at least 9 must be in fields other than history. No more than 18 credits in courses outside of History may be counted toward the doctoral degree.

Courses Required

All students must take three method courses selected from the following, at least one of which must be Hist 712 or Hist 713:

  • Hist 712 Historiography and Theory of History, 3 credits
  • Hist 713 Historical Research Methods, 3 credits
  • Hist 715 Research Methods in Local History, 3 credits
  • Hist 716 Professional and Pedagogical Issues in History, 3 credits
  • Hist 717 History and the New Media, 3 credits

All students must also take History 990, Dissertation Research (6 credits minimum), and 12 credits of electives (may include additional dissertation credits).

Advising

The Director of Graduate Studies provides initial advising for the student in selecting courses and assists in selecting a Major Professor for long-term advising; the Director may assign a provisional graduate advisor before students select a Major Professor.

Students are required to consult periodically with, and have their schedules approved by, the Director of Graduate Studies, the provisional advisor, or the Major Professor. The Major Professor helps the student to define a dissertation topic and assists the student in choosing appropriate courses and in selecting members of the student's Preliminary Examination and Doctoral Committees. The Major Professor normally chairs the student's Preliminary Examination and Doctoral Committees.

Foreign Language or Data Analysis Proficiency

Students must demonstrate proficiency in one or more relevant foreign languages by passing a written examination in the translation of source materials or historical analysis. If a student's Major Professor considers proficiency in more than one language necessary to the student's specific plan of study, exams in more than one language may be required.

With the approval of the Major Professor, a student may substitute proficiency in another skill relevant to historical study; in these cases, proficiency will be demonstrated through relevant course work.

Minor

Students are not required to elect a minor field, but they may wish to supplement their chosen specialty in this way. Depending on the particular course array, students may need to take more than 54 credits to complete both the major and minor requirements. Those who wish to take a minor have three options:

Option A: Minor in one field

Working with a minor professor, students take 8-12 credits in a single department, leading to a minor examination.

Option B: Interdisciplinary Minor

Students take 8-12 credits in two or more departments, selected for their relevance to the student's area of specialty. The minor will be defined in consultation with the student's Major Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies.

Option C: Minor in Public History

This 21-credit minor is appropriate for students planning a career in archives, museums, historic preservation, or other related specialties. It is not available to students who already have a specialization or degree in public history at the master's level. Students in this minor are required to take 12 credits as follows:

History 700 Introduction to Public History, 3 credits
History 701 Internship in Public History, 6 credits
History 715 Research Methods in Local History, 3 credits

Students must take History 700 in the first semester of their first year. The remaining 9 credits in public history must be selected from courses that pertain to the area of public history in which the student wishes to specialize.

For students interested in careers as archivists, electives should be selected from the following courses:

L&I Sci 681 Using Archives: The Value of Primary Sources in the Information Age, 3 credits
L&I Sci 775 Modern Archives Administration, 3 credits
L&I Sci 777 Seminar in Modern Archives Administration, 3 credits
L&I Sci 778 Archival Outreach: Programs and Services, 3 credits
L&I Sci 779 Arrangement and Description in Archives, 3 credits
L&I Sci 790 Fieldwork in Archives and Manuscripts, 3 credits

Students interested in careers in museums are advised to take at least three of the following courses:

Anthro 720 History and Theory of Museums, 3 credits
Anthro 721 Administration and Organization of Museums, 3 credits
Anthro 722 Museum Exhibits, 3 credits
Anthro 723 Museum Curation, 3 credits

Students interested in careers in historic preservation are advised to take at least three of the following:

Arch 560 Introduction to Historic Preservation, 3 credits
Arch 760 History of Building Architecture, 3 credits
Arch 835 Studies in Architectural History and Precedent: (Historic Preservation), 3 credits
Arch 531 Historic Concepts of Architecture, 3 credits
Arch 533 Vernacular Buildings and Groupings, 3 credits
Doctoral Preliminary Examination

The doctoral preliminary examination includes written and oral components designed to demonstrate the breadth of a student's knowledge and the ability to conduct advanced historical research. It must be taken within five years of enrollment in the Ph.D. program.

Students who fail the doctoral preliminary examination may not proceed to the dissertation. The exam may be retaken only once. The Director of Graduate Studies provides specific guidelines for selecting the Doctoral Preliminary Examination Committee and preparing the doctoral preliminary examination proposal.

Dissertation

The dissertation is a major piece of original research representing a substantial contribution to historical scholarship. In consultation with the Major Professor, the student chooses a dissertation committee, which must approve the prospectus. The student's Major Professor provides guidance in preparing the prospectus and in developing and writing the dissertation.

Dissertation Defense

The candidate must pass an oral examination in defense of the dissertation.

Time Limit and Residence

All degree requirements must be completed within ten years from the date of initial enrollment in the doctoral program. To meet the continuous-year portion of the residence credit requirement, students must complete 8 to 12 graduate credits in each of two consecutive semesters, or 6 or more graduate credits in each of three consecutive semesters, exclusive of summer sessions. In exceptional cases, modifications of the residence requirement may be requested, subject to the approval of the History Department and the Graduate School.

Courses

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Courses numbered 300-699 are Undergraduate/Graduate. Courses numbered 700 and above are Graduate only.

301 History of Christianity, East and West: to 1500. 3 cr. U/G.
Development of the institutional church; major church leaders; theological and doctrinal changes; worship, liturgy, and arts of Christendom; Christianity and social change. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
302 History of Christianity, East and West Since 1500. 3 cr. U/G.
Development of the institutional church; major church leaders, theological and doctrinal changes; worship, liturgy and arts of Christendom; Christianity and social change. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
303 A History of Greek Civilization: The Greek City-State. 3 cr. U/G.
Greek history from prehistoric times to the death of Alexander the Great. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
304 A History of Greek Civilization: The Age of Alexander the Great. 3 cr. U/G.
The Macedonian state to the death of Alexander the Great; the Hellenistic states. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
307 A History of Rome: The Republic. 3 cr. U/G.
Roman history from the beginnings of the Roman state to the death of Julius Caesar. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
308 A History of Rome: The Empire. 3 cr. U/G.
Roman history from the death of Julius Caesar to the fall of the empire in the west. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
318 Medieval Civilization: The High Middle Ages. 3 cr. U/G.
The intellectual development of medieval Europe, from the twelfth century to the fourteenth century. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
319 The Era of the Crusades. 3 cr. U/G.
A consideration of the relationships between western Europe and the East in the period of the Crusades. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
320 History of Medieval Warfare. 3 cr. U/G.
Evolution of warfare in the Middle Ages; technology, tactics, strategy, and interaction with politics and culture. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
325 The Renaissance. 3 cr. U/G.
Culture and society in Europe from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century; early Italian Renaissance to Elizabethan England; the Age of Discovery. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
329 The Roman Catholic Church, 1500 to the Present. 3 cr. U/G.
History of the Catholic Church from the Renaissance to the present. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
330 The Papacy in History. 3 cr. U/G.
Examination of the papacy, the world's most visible and influential religious office, from its origins to the present. Not open to students w/cr in Hist 600 w/same topic. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
341 Imperial Russia. 3 cr. U/G.
Development of autocracy and expansion of Russia's multi-ethnic empire; Russian economic, political, and intellectual developments under the tsars; reform and revolution. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
343 Russia Since 1917. 3 cr. U/G.
Russian cultural, social, and political history since the revolutions of 1917. Prereq: jr st;. satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
345 The Modern Balkans: Nationalism, War, and Democracy. 3 cr. U/G.
Fall of the Ottoman Empire; revolutionary movements; emergence of national states; socio-political and cultural developments; Second World War; socialist regimes; civil wars and democratic transitions. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
346 Poland and Its Neighbors, 1914-1945. 3 cr. U/G.
The effects of two world wars in East-Central Europe. The independence and subjugation of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and the Baltic States. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
348 Poland and Its Neighbors, 1945 to the Present. 3 cr. U/G.
Developments in Poland, East Germany, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary since the Second World War. The origins, development, decline, and fall of communist rule in Central Europe. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
353 Ireland Since 1600: Colony to Independent State. 3 cr. U/G.
Irish history from 1600 to the present. Topics include the famine, nationalism, and relationship with England. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
355 Modern and Contemporary France. 3 cr. U/G.
France as a political experiment, complex society, intellectual and cultural center, and imperial power since 1815, with emphasis on the period since the late nineteenth century. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
358 The Jews of Modern Europe: History and Culture. 3 cr. U/G.
History of the Jews in Europe from the middle of the eighteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on their cultural production. Hist 358 & Jewish 358 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: jr st.
363 Germany: Hitler and the Nazi Dictatorship. 3 cr. U/G.
Rise and fall of Third Reich; Weimar Republic and collapse; Hitler's conquest of power, national socialist state, World War II; catastrophe and reconstruction. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
364 The Holocaust: Anti-Semitism & the Fate of Jewish People in Europe, 1933-45. 3 cr. U/G.
The rise of Nazism; anti-Semitism; annihilation of Jews and other ethnic and religious minorities; Jewish responses and resistance; legacy of persecution. Not open for cr to students with Hist 295 'Historical Encounters: The Holocaust.' Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
370 Topics in the History of Religious Thought: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Selected topics in the history of religious thought, for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Intensive reading and student reports will be stressed. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
371 Topics in European History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Selected themes and issues in European history. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
372 Topics in Global History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Selected issues in global history. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
373 Topics in Gender and History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Selected topics in the history of gender, family, and sexuality. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
374 Europe: The Age of the Dictators, 1914-1945. 3 cr. U/G.
Fascism, communism, and the decline of democracy; origins and consequences of the First and Second World Wars. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
375 Contemporary European History, 1945 to the Present. 3 cr. U/G.
The Cold War; the recovery of Europe; student revolutions and spiritual crisis; economic stagnation; moves toward European unification; breakup of the Soviet bloc. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
376 History of Ancient China, Earliest Times to 220 A.D. 3 cr. U/G.
History of China through First Unification and Great Empire of Han Dynasty; attention to development of distinctive qualities of Chinese philosophy, politics, society, and material culture. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
377 Modern China. 3 cr. U/G.
China in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from the Opium Wars to the establishment of People's Republic in 1949. Major political, economic and social issues. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
378 Revolution in China. 3 cr. U/G.
History of the socialist revolution in China. Background examination of the Chinese communist movement, but major emphasis on People's Republic from 1949 to the present. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
380 Buddhism: A Cultural History. 3 cr. U/G.
Development of Buddhist culture in Asia and contemporary globalized world; intertwining themes of individual purification and Buddhist visions of just and unjust societies. Prereq: jr st; completion GER English Composition competency req.
382 Southeast Asia: The Age of Imperialism and Revolution Since 1800. 3 cr. U/G.
A survey of the region beginning with the European occupation of the mainland and ending with the Vietnam War. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
383 North Africa from the Arab Conquest to the Present. 3 cr. U/G.
The process of Islamization, Arabization, and urbanization of North Africa from the seventh century to the present, including the Spanish-North African interrelationship. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
385 Political Islam to Zionism: Middle Eastern Intellectual History, 1789-1990. 3 cr. U/G.
Modern Middle Eastern political ideas; Napoleon's 1798 invasion of Egypt to 1979 Iranian Revolution and its aftermath; feminism, radical Islam, Arab socialism, Zionism, nationalism, colonialism. Counts as repeat of Hist 401 w/similar topic. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
386 Africa: The Age of Empires to 1880. 3 cr. U/G.
Survey of the highlights of early African history; empires black and white; religion; slavery; material culture. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
387 Africa: Imperialism and Independence Since 1880. 3 cr. U/G.
The phases of colonial relationships and the parties involved; conquest, pacification, and independence of African states. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
392 The History of Southern Africa. 3 cr. U/G.
Surveys the history of South Africa and Zimbabwe with special reference to the twentieth century, comparing their struggles for majority rule. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
393 History of Mexico. 3 cr. U/G.
An upper-division survey course spanning all periods of Mexican history, with special emphasis on the historical origins and development of major contemporary issues. Prereq: jr st or cons instr; satisfaction of GER English composition competency req.
394 History of Japan to 1600. 3 cr. U/G.
Japanese political, economic, and social development, cultural change, and major historical figures, from ancient times to 1600. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
395 History of Japan Since 1600. 3 cr. U/G.
Japan's rise as modern nation-state and economic power; evolution of social, political, cultural institutions from establishment of Tokugawa shogunate through Meji restoration to present. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
400 Topics in Latin American and Caribbean History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Selected themes and issues in the history of South America, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
401 Topics in Middle Eastern History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Selected themes and issues in Middle Eastern history. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9cr max. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
402 Topics in Asian History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Selected themes and issues in the history of Asia. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
403 American Origins, 1600-1750. 3 cr. U/G.
The beginnings of plantation society in the South, colonist-Indian relations, Puritanism, Quakers, colonial riots and rebellions, the Great Awakening, Imperial system. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
404 Topics in American History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Selected themes and issues in the history of the United States. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
405 The Age of the American Revolution, 1750-1789. 3 cr. U/G.
Background to revolution; British policy and American protest; political, social, diplomatic, and military phases of the War for Independence; Articles of Confederation; Constitution of 1787. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
409 Causes of the Civil War, 1828-1861. 3 cr. U/G.
Examination of the relationship between sectional conflict and political and social developments; the explanation of the causes and timing of the Civil War. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
410 Civil War and Reconstruction: The United States, 1861-1877. 3 cr. U/G.
The military conflict from Sumter to Appomattox; policies of Lincoln, Reconstruction and aftermath of slavery. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
418 America in Prosperity, Depression and War, 1921-1945. 3 cr. U/G.
The Twenties as a transition period; the Great Depression; Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal; foreign policies and U.S. participation in World War II. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
419 America Since 1945. 3 cr. U/G.
Postwar America, including social and economic developments, Cold War rivalries, and the changing political scenes from the Truman years to the present. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
420 The History of the American Presidency: A Biographical Approach. 3 cr. U/G.
A biographical study of American presidents from Washington to Nixon; their backgrounds, leadership styles, successes, failures, and legacies. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
421 American Thought and Culture to 1860. 3 cr. U/G.
Major intellectual movements in America: Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, religion, political thought, higher education, science, parallel movements in art and architecture. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
430 American Constitutional Development, 1876 to the Present. 3 cr. U/G.
Problems of government and the economy, civil rights and civil liberties in war and peace as reflected in controversies over meaning of the federal constitution. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English composition competency req.
434 The United States as a World Power in the 20th Century. 3 cr. U/G.
How the United States became involved in two world wars and a cold war, while spreading its interests and influence across the globe. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
435 Ethnic America: To 1880. 3 cr. U/G.
Survey of the conflict between cultural diversity and the melting pot, included are theories about and experiences of ethnic groups in America, particularly the bad west. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English composition competency req.
439 The Italian-American Experience in the United States. 3 cr. U/G.
Italian-American cultural history, including the arts, religion, entertainment, family relationships and discrimination encountered; Italian-American experience in the context of the global diaspora. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
440 History of the American Working Classes. 3 cr. U/G.
The social and occupational composition of the American working classes and their response to capitalism, socialism, and the organized labor movement. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
445 African Americans from Slavery to Freedom. 3 cr. U/G.
African-American history from shores of Africa through Atlantic slave trade to plantation slavery and formation of an African-American community in the New World. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
446 African Americans Since the Civil War. 3 cr. U/G.
The search for justice and equality, from emancipation in 1865 to the civil rights revolution of the 1960's and beyond. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
448 Baseball in American History. 3 cr. U/G.
The origins and development of baseball in the United States, its rise as a spectator sport, and its place in American life and culture. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
449 Popular Culture in America, 1800 to the Present. 3 cr. U/G.
Popular culture seen through artifacts and the mass media: popular music, newspapers, magazines, dime novels, film, comics, TV, radio, folk heroes, sports, and 'stars.' Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
450 Growth of Metropolitan Milwaukee. 3 cr. U/G.
History of the city and county of Milwaukee and Milwaukee suburbs, emphasizing population patterns; government; economic change; social, cultural and educational institutions; and spatial relationships. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
451 History of Wisconsin. 3 cr. U/G.
Political, economic and social development of Wisconsin, especially since 1815, with attention to such major personalities as the La Follettes, Kohlers, Turner, Hoard, Wright, and Gale. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
452 History of Religion in American Life to 1870. 3 cr. U/G.
Development of different religions in America; role of religion in American society, politics; church attitudes on race and war; lives of religious leaders; theology. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
453 History of Religion in American Life Since 1870. 3 cr. U/G.
Development of different religions in America; role of religion in American society, politics; church attitudes on race and war; lives of religious leaders; theology. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
456 The Human Side of History: American Biographies. 3 cr. U/G.
The study of American history through biography, emphasizing a variety of figures who represent major historical issues, ideas, and movements. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
460 The History of Poverty in America. 3 cr. U/G.
Social welfare policies and programs (including evolution of social work profession), 1620-present, in light of major developments in American social and intellectual history. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
463 History of the American City. 3 cr. U/G.
Character of American urbanization and its social and political consequences; responses to 'urban problems' from the early nineteenth century to the present. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
468 The American Feminist Movement. 3 cr. U/G.
History of the American feminist movement from colonial times to the present. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
469 Manhood in America. 3 cr. U/G.
A gendered exploration of the history of masculinity in the United States; how various styles and functions of manhood changed over time. Counts as repeat of Hist 373 w/topic 'Manhood in America.' Prereq: jr st, satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req; or grad st.
473 History of Wisconsin Indians. 3 cr. U/G.
History of Wisconsin tribes from their earliest years to the present, including European contacts, treaties, the fur trade, and wars. AIS 473 & Hist 473 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req.
474 Topics in North American Indian History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Detailed examination of such topics as Indian legal status, culture change, Indian education, Pan-Indianism and gender roles. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. AIS 474 & Hist 474 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
475 American Indian History, Law, and Government. 3 cr. U/G.
American Indian political systems; their interaction with U.S. Indian policy. Indigenous systems of governance; European Legal justification for colonization; American Indian sovereignty; Federal-Tribal relationship. No cr for students w/cr in Hist 474 w/similar topic. AIS 475 & Hist 475 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
497 Study Abroad: (Subtitled). 1-12 cr. U/G.
Designed to enroll students in UWM sponsored program before coursework level, content and credits are determined and/or in specially prepared program coursework. Retakable w/chg in topic. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of English Composition competency req; acceptance for Study Abroad Prog.
594 Methods and Theory in the Historical Study of Religion: (Subtitled). 3 cr. U/G.
Methods and historiography in the history of religion; focus on a particular religious-historical complex. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: jr st; satisfaction of GER English Composition competency req.
595 The Quantitative Analysis of Historical Data. 3 cr. U/G.
Statistical methods and the computer in analysis of historical problems: statistics through regression; use of social science computer package; special techniques for handling historical data. Prereq: jr st, completion of GER English Composition & Mathematical Skills competency reqs; 3 yr HS Math, grade of C or better in Math 105(P) or Math placement test score of 30.
595 (effective 01/26/2015) The Quantitative Analysis of Historical Data. 3 cr. U/G.
Statistical methods and the computer in analysis of historical problems: statistics through regression; use of social science computer package; special techniques for handling historical data. Prereq: jr st; completion of Oral and Written Communication (OWC) Competency Part A & Quantitative Literacy (QL) Competency Part A GERs.
596 Maps as Historical Sources. 3 cr. U/G.
Introduction to maps, both as historical artifacts and as instruments for reinterpreting historical realities. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req.
597 Fields and Methods in Public History. 3 cr. U/G.
Career opportunities for historians in historical agencies, focusing on the work and methods of archivists, museum curators, historic preservationists, oral historians, and administrators. Prereq: jr st; completion of GER English Composition competency req; cons coord of public hist.
700 Introduction to Public History. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on community history, relations between academic history and public history, and uses of material culture and oral history. Prereq: grad st.
701 Internship in Public History. 1-6 cr. G.
Requirements determined and evaluation arranged on an individual basis. Total of 6 cr required for the public history specialization of the M.A. degree and the optional public history minor in the PhD degree. Prereq: grad st; cons coord of public history.
712 Historiography and Theory of History. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on history of historical writing and thought, including such theoretical problems as objectivity, generalization, the nature of historical explanation, and the value of history. Prereq: grad st.
713 Historical Research Methods. 3 cr. G.
Seminar addressing evaluation of evidence, quantitative methods, and application of social science methodology to historical research. Prereq: grad st.
715 Research Methods in Local History. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on history and methodology of studying small towns, rural areas, cities, and neighborhoods in the United States. Prereq: grad st.
716 Professional and Pedagogical Issues in History. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on professional and pedagogical aspects of historical work, including course management, lecture writing, grading, and grant writing. Prereq: grad st.
717 History and the New Media. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on uses of new forms of technology in historical research and teaching. Prereq: grad st.
740 Approaches to the Modern I. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on major figures and intellectual forces that have shaped multiple approaches to the modern across the academy. English 740, Hist 740, & MALLT 740 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st.
741 Approaches to the Modern II. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on major figures and intellectual forces that have shaped approaches to the modern across periods. English 741, Hist 741 & MALLT 741 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st.
800 Colloquium on U.S. History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Seminar on issues and problems in U.S. history. Specific topics announced in Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
805 Colloquium: The Age of Jackson. 3 cr. G.
Studies in basic aspects of American history between 1815 and 1848 with emphasis on changing interpretations. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
809 Colloquium on Readings in the Gilded Age, 1877-1901. 3 cr. G.
Seminar that surveys historical literature on politics, culture, and society in late 19th century United States. Prereq: grad st.
813 Colloquium: Twentieth-Century Problems in American History. 3 cr. G.
A study of selected aspects of the American domestic scene and of important contemporary historians and their interpretations of the recent past. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
825 Colloquium in the History of the South. 3 cr. G.
Studies of aspects of the history of the south with emphasis on changing interpretations. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
831 Colloquium on U.S. Labor History. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on topics in the history of the working classes in the U.S. since 1800. Prereq: grad st.
833 Colloquium on Urban History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Seminar on issues and problems in urban development and institutions. Specific topics announced in Schedule of Classes each time course is offered. Retakable w/ chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
835 Colloquium-Literature of Milwaukee. 3 cr. G.
Examination and analysis of the documentation of Milwaukee's history, biography, memoirs, fiction, newspapers and periodicals, government documents and reports, manuscripts, maps, iconographic materials, and physical survivals. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
839 Approaches to Global History. 3 cr. G.
Seminar on historiography and practices of global and comparative history. Prereq: grad st.
840 Colloquium on Global History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Seminar on historical developments from a global or comparative perspective. Specific topics announced in Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
841 Colloquium on Modern Studies: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Seminar on historical developments from a modern studies perspective. Specific topics and any additional prerequisites announced in Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
850 Colloquium on European History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Seminar on issues and problems in European history. Specific topics announced in Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
859 Colloquium in Medieval Economic History. 3 cr. G.
Studies in the economic and social history of the middle ages. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
862 Colloquium in the History of Renaissance and Reformation Europe: 3 cr. G.
Introduction to important primary and secondary sources for the period; historiographical problems; different periods and/or problems are dealt with from semester to semester. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
868 Colloquium in Modern British History. 3 cr. G.
Review basic historical literature on development of British economy, social structure and relations, political institutions, and cultural values since industrial revolution. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
880 Colloquium: European Diplomatic History. 3 cr. G.
Studies in modern European diplomatic history, emphasizing historiography, interpretation, and archival sources. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
888 Candidate for Degree. 0 cr. G.
Available for graduate students who must meet minimum credit load requirement. Fee for 1 cr assessed. Prereq: grad st.
894 Colloquium in Tropical History: Colonial Rule. 3 cr. G.
The colonial period both from the point of view of the european rulers and the colonized peoples of the third world. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
898 Colloquium in Modern Chinese History. 3 cr. G.
Studies in 19th and 20th century Chinese history with emphasis on the main thematic approaches employed by Chinese, Japanese, European, and American historians. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
900 Seminar on U.S. History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Topics in U.S. history. Specific topics announced in Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
903 Seminar: American Political Hist in Revolutionary & Early National Periods. 3 cr. G.
Studies in American political history in the age of the founding fathers. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
904 Seminar in Modern America. 3 cr. G.
Research in United States history since 1921. Prereq: grad st.
907 Seminar on U.S. Intellectual and Cultural History. 3 cr. G.
Intellectual and cultural figures and movements in U.S. history. Prereq: grad st.
924 Seminar In American Economic History. 3 cr. G.
Problems in the economic history of the United States. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
940 Seminar on Global History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Historical developments from a global or comparative perspective. Specific topics announced in Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
950 Seminar on European History: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Topics in European history. Specific topics announced in Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
965 Seminar on European Intellectual and Cultural History. 3 cr. G.
Intellectual and cultural figures and movements in European history. Prereq: grad st.
970 Seminar on European Political History. 3 cr. G.
State, society, revolution, war and empire in European history. Prereq: grad st.
971 Seminar on the History of American Urban Problems. 3 cr. G.
Historical analysis of the current problems of housing, race relations, the powers and functions of municipal government, law enforcement, and city planning in the United States. Hist 971 & Urb Std 971 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st.
972 Seminar on Modern Studies: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Theory and practice of avant-garde culture in Europe and the Americas since the mid-nineteenth century. Specific topics and any additional prerequisites announced in the Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/ chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
973 Seminar on Non-Western History: 3 cr. G.
Significant themes and eras in the history of non-Western peoples and nations. Specific topics and any additional prerequisites announced in Timetable each time course is offered. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
980 Growth of Urban Society. 3 cr. G.
Seminar in historical, social, and ecological growth and development of urban agglomerations. Comparative framework will be used to examine the urban process. Hist 980 & Urb Std 980 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st.
985 Master's Thesis Research. 1-6 cr. G.
For students in the thesis option. Retakable to 6 cr max. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
989 Master's Level Independent Work. 1-3 cr. G.
Independent study on topics selected in agreement with supervising professor. Retakable to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
990 Dissertation Research. 1-6 cr. G.
Research or dissertation work for students in the doctoral program in History. Retakable as necessary to fulfill dissertation requirements. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
999 Doctoral Level Independent Work. 1-3 cr. G.
Independent study on topics selected in agreement with supervising professor. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.

Page last updated on: 08/05/2014