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Health Sciences

School/College: College of Health Sciences

Degree Conferred:

  • Ph.D. in Health Sciences

Contents

Overview

The Ph.D. in Health Sciences is an interdisciplinary degree program designed to accomplish three major objectives:

  1. Provide advanced study and research training opportunities in the human health sciences.
  2. Produce cohorts of scholars capable of advancing the discovery, dissemination, and application of new knowledge in the health sciences.
  3. Prepare future academic leaders in the health sciences.

The curriculum includes a set of core courses providing a comprehensive structure for doctoral education including:

  • Philosophical foundations.
  • Concepts and practices that contribute to students, development as teaching scholars.
  • Research methods.
  • A series of seminars that build students, critical thinking skills, familiarity with a range of health sciences research topics, and experience in scholarly dialogue and presentation.
Concentrations and cross-disciplinary courses

In addition to the core courses, the program includes concentration and cross-disciplinary courses in areas such as disability and rehabilitation, diagnostic and biomedical sciences, human movement sciences, population health, and health administration/policy. Independent research and the dissertation will be structured according to the choice of specialization.

Graduate Faculty

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(Professors' home departments appear in parentheses)

Professors
Azenabor, Anthony, Ph.D., University of Benin (Biomedical Sciences)
Cisler, Ron, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (Health Informatics and Administration)
Eells, Janis, Ph.D., University of Iowa (Biomedical Sciences)
Engel, Joyce, Ph.D., University of Kansas, Lawrence (Occupational Science & Technology)
Garg, Arun, Ph.D., University of Michigan (Occupational Science & Technology)
Greenleaf, Christy, Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Greensboro (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Haertlein, Carol, Ph.D., Marquette University (Occupational Science and Technology)
Johnston, Mark, Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University (Occupational Science and Technology)
King, Phyllis, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (Occupational Science & Technology)
Meyer, Barbara, Ph.D., Michigan State University (Kinesiology-Integrative Health Care and Performance)
Rhyner, Paula, Ph.D., Kent State University (Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Smith, Roger, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison (Occupational Science & Technology)
Strath, Scott, Ph.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Associate Professors
Alt, Carlynn, Ph.D., Clinical Assoc. Professor Marquette University (Kinesiology-Integrative Health Care and Performance)
Cobb, Stephen, Ph.D., Georgia State University (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Earl, Jennifer, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University (Kinesiology-Integrative Health Care and Performance)
Ebersole, Kyle, Ph.D., University of Nebraska (Kinesiology-Integrative Health Care and Performance)
Gelfer, Marylou, Ph.D., University of Florida (Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Keenan, Kevin, Ph.D., University of Colorado (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Lund, Shelley, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University (Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Moerchen, Victoria, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison (Kinesiology-Integrative Health Care and Performance)
O'Connor, Kristian, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts-Amherst (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Patrick, Timothy, Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia (Health Informatics and Administration)
Seery, Carol, Ph.D., University of Washington-Seattle (Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Stoffel, Virginia, Ph.D., Cardinal Stritch University (Occupational Science & Technology)
Swartz, Ann, Ph.D., University of Tennessee (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Trinh, Hanh, Ph.D., Medical College of Virginia (Health Informatics and Administration)
Wu, Min, Ph.D., Medical School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Health Informatics and Administration)
Zalewski, Kathryn, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (Kinesiology-Integrative Health Care and Performance)
Assistant Professors
Arvinen-Barrow, Monna, Ph.D., University of Northampton, United Kingdom (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Barnekow, Kris, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison (Occupational Science & Technology)
Doll, Jennifer, Ph.D., Washington University (Biomedical Sciences)
Hassan, Wail, Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi (Biomedical Sciences)
Heilmann, John, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison (Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Heuer, Sabine, Ph.D., Ohio University (Communication Sciences and Disorders)
Huddleston, Wendy, Ph.D., Medical College of Wisconsin (Kinesiology-Integrative Health Care and Performance)
Kate, Rohit, Ph.D., University of Texas- Austin (Health Informatics and Administration)
Kapellusch, Jay, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (Occupational Science & Technology)
Klos, Lori, Ph.D., Cornell University (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Luo, Jake, Ph.D., Queens University- Belfast (Health Informatics and Administration)
Lyons, Jeri-Anne, Ph.D., Medical College of Wisconsin (Biomedical Sciences)
Nambisan, Priya, Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (Health Informatics and Administration)
Nardelli, Dean, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison (Biomedical Sciences)
Prasad, Rashmi, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (Health Informatics and Administration)
Seo, Na Jin, Ph.D., University of Michigan-Ann Arbor (Engineering/Occupational Science & Technology)
Sindhu, Bhagwant, Ph.D., University of Florida (Occupational Science & Technology)
Slavens, Brooke, Ph.D., Marquette University (Occupational Science & Technology)
Wang, Jinsung, Ph.D., Arizona State University (Kinesiology- Exercise Science and Health Promotion)
Wang, Ying-Chih, Ph.D., University of Florida (Occupational Science & Technology)

Doctor of Philosophy in Health Sciences

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Admission

To be considered for admission to the program applicants must satisfy all UWM Graduate School admission requirements in addition to the following College of Health Sciences requirements:

  1. Submission of scores on the General Test portion of the Graduate Record Examination; test taken within last five years.
  2. One of the following:
    • Master's degree or equivalent in an area that provides foundational academic preparation in proposed Health Sciences Ph.D. Area of Concentration.
    • Bachelor's degree with exceptional promise, as indicated by research experience/evidence of writing or an undergraduate project, recommendations, GRE scores, and undergraduate GPA.
  3. A sample of the applicant's written work that demonstrates his or her ability to conduct research and/or the ability to critically analyze the scholarly work of others.
  4. A letter outlining the applicant's academic and professional background, declaration of Area of Concentration and Major Professor as well as specific research interests and goals for the Ph.D. program. This statement should be submitted to the Graduate School and must be complete and thorough as it provides information that is central to the admission decision. This letter will serve in lieu of the Graduate School's "Reasons for Graduate Study" statement.
  5. Three letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant's intellectual achievement and potential. At least two of these letters must be from faculty or senior administrators at academic institutions.

For applicants from countries other than the U.S.A. whose first language is not English, a score of at least 250 on the computer-based (or 600 on the paper-based) Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required. A score of 6.5 on the International English Language Testing Systems (IELTS) examination will be accepted in lieu of the TOEFL.

The Ph.D. Steering Committee will make an admission recommendation and forward it to the appropriate College of Health Sciences departmental Graduate Faculty or Executive Committee and identified Major Professor. The final admission decision is contingent upon approval by the departmental Graduate Faculty Committee or Executive Committee, the applicant's Major Professor, and the Graduate School.

Prior to admission an eligible College of Health Sciences Graduate Faculty member must agree to serve as the applicant's major professor.

Reapplication

A student who has received a master's degree in Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Kinesiology, or Occupational Therapy from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee must formally reapply for admission to the Graduate School before continuing studies toward the Ph.D. degree.

Residence

The student must complete at least half of the graduate credits required for the Ph.D. in residence at UWM in doctoral status. In addition, the student must complete at least 8 graduate credits in each of two consecutive semesters, or 6 or more graduate credits in each of three consecutive semesters, exclusive of summer sessions. In exceptional cases, modifications of the residence requirement may be requested, subject to the approval of the College of Health Sciences Ph.D. Steering Committee and the Graduate School.

Course of Study

The Ph.D. program requires 72 credits beyond the Bachelor's degree, including no more than 36 credits from a related master's degree and/or other post-baccalaureate coursework. A student must complete a minimum of 36 credits at UWM including dissertation credits. Precise numbers of credits and actual course requirements will be determined after review of the applicant's previous coursework. The student plans an individual program of study in consultation with the Major Professor and Doctoral Committee that will include a set of core courses, an area of concentration, cross-disciplinary courses, electives, and the dissertation.

Core Courses (16 credits)
CL SCI 901: Philosophical Foundations of Health Research (3 credits)
HMS 702: Statistical Analysis in the Health Sciences (3 credits)
CL SCI 910: Advanced Graduate Seminar (1 credit, repeated 4 times)
OCCTHPY 900: Teaching, Learning & Educational Leadership in the Health Sciences (3 credits)
A statistical analysis, qualitative analysis, or research methods course approved by the student's Major Professor (3 credits)
Area of Concentration (minimum of 9 credits)

Courses related to the area of concentration will require students to draw upon the strengths and expertise of the faculty and curriculum in an interdisciplinary and collaborative manner. The basis of scientific exploration will be premised on the model adapted by the World Health Organization (WHO) which defines three levels contributing to the concept of health: 1) intact body structures and unimpaired host functions at the molecular, cellular or organ system level, 2) ability to participate in activities and roles at the level of the living organism or individual person, and 3) a physical and social environment that influences health at the level of society and populations.

Cross Disciplinary Courses (minimum of 6 credits)

Cross-disciplinary courses in areas such as disability and rehabilitation, diagnostic and biomedical sciences, human movement sciences, and population health and health administration/policy, will provide a unique framework and understanding for specific health states, outcomes, determinants, and environmental influences. Each of these specialties reflects trends and needs in health-related fields as well as the current expertise among faculty in CHS.

Electives (6 credits)

Elective courses relevant to the student's program of study will be selected from within CHS and from departments across campus. This cross-disciplinary approach will encourage collaboration and interaction, and provide breadth and depth to a student's focused course of study.

Dissertation (minimum of 12 credits)

The last component of the degree requirements, independent research and dissertation, will be structured by the choice of concentration. The dissertation will consist of focused, independent research that contributes to the existing body of knowledge.

Foreign Language

Foreign language coursework is optional, depending upon the recommendation of the student's Major Professor.

Doctoral Committee

In consultation with the Major Professor, each student is responsible for selecting a Doctoral Committee before completing 12 credits in the doctoral program. The doctoral committee shall consist of the student's Major Professor and four other Graduate Faculty including at least one from: 1) the area of concentration; 2), a supporting area within the College; and 3) a supporting area from outside the College. Upon formation of the Doctoral Committee, the student must file a "Doctoral Committee" form with his/her Major Professor which is to be subsequently filed with the CHS - Ph.D. Steering Committee.

Doctoral Preliminary Examinations

The doctoral preliminary examinations must be completed within three years of initial enrollment in the program. Students may receive up to two additional semesters to complete the preliminary examinations with approval of the CHS - Ph.D. Steering Committee. The examinations consist of a written examination designed to demonstrate the breadth of a student.s knowledge and the ability to conduct advanced research, and an oral exam covering issues raised during the written exam and/or focusing on the proposed dissertation research. The oral exam must follow the written exam within 10 days. Students take the preliminary examinations after completing all doctoral course work or with no more than three credits of doctoral course work remaining. Students cannot take the examinations if they have any incomplete or unreported grades or a GPA lower than 3.0. Students who fail the preliminary examinations may not proceed to the dissertation. The examinations may be retaken only once.

Dissertation Proposal

Upon successful completion of the preliminary examinations, the student submits a written dissertation proposal and delivers an oral presentation of the proposed research to the Dissertation Committee. The proposal takes the form of a scholarly document outlining the problem, its background and significance, summarizing relevant literature, and outlining the proposed research methods. It should include a tentative timetable and outline any required resources (space, equipment, etc.). Members of the student.s Dissertation Committee must approve the dissertation proposal. Acceptance of the dissertation proposal establishes an agreement between the student and the Dissertation Committee as to the nature and scope of the research to be conducted, and the procedure for completing the dissertation. Upon Dissertation Committee approval, research proposals that use animal or human subjects must receive approval from the Animal Care and Use Committee or the Institutional Review Board.

Dissertator Status

Specific requirements which must be completed before a doctoral student qualifies for dissertator status are described on the Graduate School Doctoral Requirements page.

Dissertation

The dissertation is a major piece of original research representing a substantial contribution to the existing body of knowledge. The original research findings embodied in the dissertation should be acceptable for publication in a refereed journal. The student's Major Professor and Dissertation Committee provide guidance in completing the dissertation.

Dissertation Defense

Once the dissertation document meets with Dissertation Committee approval, an oral defense takes place. At the time of the defense, the dissertation must be of publication-quality (as judged by the Dissertation Committee). The dissertation defense will be held in an open forum after which the Dissertation Committee will meet in closed session to make a decision on degree conferral. The time and place of the public presentation must be announced with adequate time (i.e., at least one week prior to the defense) so that faculty and students may attend.

Time Limit

The student must complete all requirements for the degree within seven years of the date of initial enrollment in the program. Upon successfully passing the preliminary examinations, the student must complete all requirements for the degree within four years.

Courses


Courses numbered 300 to 699 are Undergraduate/Graduate. Courses numbered 700 and above are Graduate only.

Biomedical Sciences (BMS)
610 Pharmacology. 3 cr. U/G. Lectures on pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action, and physiological effects of toxic and therapeutic substances. Prereq: jr st, Chem 501(P), or cons instr

620 Forensic Pathology. 2 cr. U/G. An overview of medicolegal death investigation from the perspective of the forensic pathologist. Prereq: jr st; Bio Sci 203(P)

705 Molecular Pathology. 3 cr. G. Principles, methods, and applications of nucleic acid-based technologies in pathology and laboratory medicine. Counts as repeat of BMS 590 with similar topic. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

715 Medical Laboratory Management and Education. 2 cr. G. Introduction to management and education theory and application to the clinical laboratory. Prereq: grad st or cons instr

756 Current Concepts in Leukemia. 4 cr. G. An overview of various forms of human acute and chronic leukemia. Emphasis on cell markers and cytomorphology, clonal etiology and kinetics. Prereq: grad st & cons instr

772 Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. 3 cr. G. A survey of the effects of antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents in microorganisms and man. Mode of action, principles of antimicrobial chemotherapy application to basic research. Prereq: lc & la course in medical microbiology; grad st or cons instr

775 Mechanisms of Infectious Disease. 2 cr. G. Review of current molecular and cellular aspects of infectious disease as related to microbial determinants of virulence and the host response. Prereq: lc & la course in medical microbiology; grad st or cons instr

782 Advanced Immunology. 3 cr. G. Cellular basis of the immune response with emphasis on immunoregulation and clinical disease manifestations resulting from altered cellular immune function. Prereq: grad st; course in immunology; cons instr

901 Seminar on Philosophical Approaches to Science. 3 cr. G. The nature and function of sciences, the logic of the scientific method as it relates to health, and implications of research and practices in health care. BMS 901 & LibrlSt 901 are jointly offered; they count as repeats of one another. Prereq: grad st.

910 Advanced Seminar in Health Sciences. 1 cr. G. Faculty, students, and guests present research topics in the Health Sciences. Retakable to 4 cr max. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

990 Research and Dissertation. 1-6 cr. G. Preparation of a dissertation under the direction of the student's primary and secondary advisors. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

Communication Sciences and Disorders (COMSDIS)
630 Communication Disorders in Multicultural Populations. 2 cr. U/G. Application of theoretical models and research perspectives to the assessment and treatment of communication disorders in children from multicultural populations. Prereq: sr st; cons instr

660 School-Age Language. 2 cr. U/G. Language disorders in older children and adolescents; application of developmental theory to assessment and intervention. Prereq: sr st; cons instr

670 (521) Advanced Procedures in Audiology. 3 cr. U/G. Masking, speech audiometry, acoustic immittance testing, differential diagnosis, audiological screening design, development and implementation, special pediatric and geriatric concerns; audiologic counseling and hearing aid orientation. Prereq: sr st; ComSDis 470(P); cons instr

690 Cognitive Communication Disorders in Adults. 2 cr. U/G. Communication disorders related to traumatic brain injury and dementia in adults. Emphasis on neuropathology, symptomatology, assessment, and management. Prereq: sr st, ComSDis 460, and cons instr; or grad st.

701 Research Design and Methods in Communication Sciences and Disorders. 3 cr. G. Introduction to design and implementation of quantitative research, including selection of research topics, literature searches, developing research hypotheses, hypothesis testing, and presentation of findings. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

702 Clinical Phonology and Articulation. 2 cr. G. Study of normal and disordered aspects of articulation and phonology. Emphasis on theoretical and practical considerations for clinical assessment and treatment. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

703 Voice Disorders. 2 cr. G. Diagnosis and treatment of hyperfunctional disorders, psychogenic voice disorders, organic diseases of the larynx, neurogenic voice disorders, cleft palate and resonance disorders, and alaryngeal speech. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

704 Speech Fluency and Stuttering. 3 cr. G. Theory and research related to the nature and treatment of stuttering. Discussion of factors important to the clinical management of fluency in children and adults. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

705 Aphasia in Adults. 3 cr. G. Nature of aphasia and related communication disorders. Study of pertinent diagnostic and prognostic techniques and therapeutic procedures. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

706 Language Assessment and Intervention in Children: Birth to 5 Years. 2 cr. G. Application of various theoretical models and research perspectives to the assessment and treatment of children with language impairments. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

709 Evaluation and Management of Swallowing Disorders. 3 cr. G. Study of normal and abnormal swallowing across the lifespan, with emphasis on etiologies, clinical and instrumental evaluation techniques, and management. Prereq: grad st; ComSDis 705(P); cons instr

710 Motor Speech Disorders. 3 cr. G. Basic neurological substrates of the dysarthrias and apraxia, differential diagnosis and treatment of acquired and developmental communication disorders associated with apraxia and dysarthria. Prereq: grad st; ComSDis 703(P) & 705(P)

711 (801) Applied Speech Science. 3 cr. G. Advanced study of physiological, acoustical, and perceptual perspectives of normal and abnormal speech production mechanisms; laboratory experience with speech science instrumentation for research/clinical application. Counts as repeat of ComSDis 801. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

715 (680) Assessment and Intervention in Augmentative and Alternative Communication. 3 cr. G. Application of current research in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for assessment, prescription of AAC systems, and intervention planning for individuals with severe communication disorders. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

717 Special Populations in Communication Disorders. 2 cr. G. Seminar reviewing the current literature on selected populations of individuals with communication disorders and the implications of this literature on clinical practice. Prereq: grad st

728 (908) Instrumentation Laboratory. 1 cr. G. Hands-on experience with speech science instrumentation for acoustic analysis of voice, prosody, and nasal resonance. Counts as repeat of ComSDis 908. Prereq: grad st; Com SDis 801(P) & conc reg in ComSDis 902 (voice clinic) or cons instr

799 Independent Studies. 1-3 cr. G. Independent pursuit of a creative project designed by the student and supervised by a faculty or instructional academic staff member. Prereq: grad st; cons grad advisor.

802 Seminar in Applied Phonology: (Subtitled). 1 cr. G. Specific topic and any additional prerequisites announced in the Timetable each time the course is offered. May be repeated w/chg in topic to 7 cr max. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

804 Seminar in Stuttering and Fluency: (Subtitled). 1 cr. G. Specific topic and any additional prerequisites announced in the Timetable each time the course is offered. May be repeated w/chg in topic to 7 cr max. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

Health Care Administration (HCA)
700 Introduction to Health Care Informatics. 2 cr. G. An introduction to the history, theory, applications, and organizational context of health informatics. Prereq: grad st or cons instr

721 Health Information Technology Procurement. 2 cr. G. A study of the concepts related to acquisition of information technology, including evaluation, selection, and contracts. Emphasis on integration of information technology and strategic planning. Prereq: grad st; Bus Adm 749(C) or CompSci 557(C) or HIA 442(C) or cons instr

723 Health Care Systems Applications - Administrative and Clinical. 3 cr. G. A study of the administrative and clinical applications of health information systems with emphasis on content, functional and technical requirements. Prereq: grad st; Bus Adm 749(C) or CompSci 557(C) or HIA 442(C) or cons instr

Human Movement Sciences (HMS)
702 Statistical Analysis in the Health Sciences. 3 cr. G. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses as they apply to health science research. Prereq: grad st; intro level statistics course at U/G or G level

725 Interdisciplinary Themes in Biomechanics. 3 cr. G. Emphasis on biomechanical research themes of an interdisciplinary character. Readings drawn from primary research literature. Prereq: grad st; HMS 520(P) or cons instr

730 Advanced Metabolic/Endocrine Physiology of Exercise. 3 cr. G. Study of muscle function, fuel utilization, endocrine function and temperature regulation during exercise and training. Prereq: grad st; HMS 530

731 Advanced Cardiorespiratory Physiology of Exercise. 3 cr. G. Examination of selected mechanisms regulating cardiovascular and pulmonary adjustments to acute and chronic exercise. Prereq: grad st; HMS 330; HMS 530(R) & Bio Sci 715(R)

761 Concepts of Human Motor Control. 3 cr. G. A systematic examination of neuromotor control mechanisms and critical review of research in human motor behavior focusing on variables limiting or facilitating performance and/or skill acquisition. Prereq: grad st, HMS 561(P) or cons instr

762 Research Practicum in Motor Control. 3 cr. G. Demonstration/participation laboratory focused on human motor control experimental design. Topics include sampling, subject protection, techniques for quantification of motor performance characteristics and neuromuscular correlates. Prereq: grad st; HMS 561(P) or cons instr

799 Independent Reading. 1-3 cr. G. Independent study of a topic selected by the student in consultation with the supervising graduate faculty member. May be repeated with change in topic to max of 6 cr. Prereq: grad st; cons instr

822 Biomechanics Research Practicum. 3 cr. G. Addresses research design issues, data collection and reduction techniques. Validity, reliability, and theory of biomechanics instrumentation systems (videography, cinematography, electromyography, force/torque transduction). Prereq: grad st; HMS 725(P) or cons instr

850 Seminar in Psychological Aspects of Physical Activity: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G. Advanced seminar on selected topics in the psychology of physical activity. May be repeated with change in topic to max of 6 cr. Prereq: grad st; HMS 550(P) or cons instr

851 Psychological Factors in Preventive and Rehabilitative Exercise. 3 cr. G. Advanced seminar in exercise psychology. Personal and social psychological factors relevant to preventive and rehabilitative exercise contexts are examined. Prereq: grad st; HMS 550(P) or cons instr

860 Seminar in Motor Control: (Subtitled). 3-6 cr. G. Advanced seminar on selected topics related to motor control and acquisition of movement skill. May be repeated with change of topic to max of 6 cr. Prereq: grad st; HMS 761(P); cons instr

870 Seminar in Sociological Aspects of Physical Activity: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G. Advanced seminar on selected topics in sociology of physical activity. May be repeated with change in topic to max of 6 cr. Prereq: grad st; HMS 570(P) or cons instr

871 Socialization and Physical Activity. 3 cr. G. Advanced seminar on research relevant to the development/lack of development of physically active lifestyles. Prereq: grad st; HMS 870(P) or cons instr

888 Candidate for Degree. 0 cr. G. Available for graduate students who must meet minimum credit load requirement. Fee for 1 cr assessed. Prereq: grad st

891 Research Seminar. 3 cr. G. Advanced seminar on the synthesis and critique of research literature within the student's primary and secondary subdisciplines. Not open to option A students. Prereq: grad st; completion of all or conc reg in remaining coursework for degree

930 Practicum and Seminar in Exercise Physiology. 3 cr. G. Evaluation of current research and methodology in exercise physiology. Prereq: grad st; HMS 730 or 731

990 Research and Thesis. 1-6 cr. G. Preparation of a thesis under the direction of the student's primary and secondary advisors. May be repeated to max of 6 cr. Not open to students selecting options B or C. Prereq: grad st

Occupational Therapy (OCCTHPY)
701 Advanced Application of Instrumentation Theory in Health Care. 3 cr. G. Reviews and critiques measurement theories and instruments used by health related researchers and professionals. Includes traditional, outcome and contemporary methods differing from classical psychometric theory. Prereq: grad st.

702 Research in Occupational Therapy. 3 cr. G. Study of research design pertinent to various areas of clinical practice in occupational therapy. Development of literature review and hypothesis for project/thesis. Prereq: grad st; Occthpy 701(P); Quantitative & Qualitative Research courses or equiv; cons instr

720 Advanced Application of Occupational Therapy Theory. 3 cr. G. Critical analysis of occupational therapy theories as they relate to practice issues, strategies, and research. Prereq: grad st

730 Industrial Rehabilitation. 3 cr. G. Examines current practices and future trends in the prevention and management of work-related disorders within the context of industry. Prereq: grad st

740 Advanced Topics in Pediatric Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 cr. G. Examines current practices and future trends for evaluation and treatment of occupational performance between birth and 21 years of age within family and community contexts. Prereq: grad st

741 Research Seminar. 1 cr. G. Scholarly discussion forum for graduate students completing their thesis/project. Prereq: grad st; OccThpy 890(C) or 990(C) or cons instr.

750 Computer Applications in Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 cr. G. Exploration of the current and future uses of computer technology in the field of occupational therapy. Completion of a student-designed software application. Prereq: grad st

760 Assistive and Rehabilitation Technology. 3 cr. G. Surveys the use of assistive technology devices and applications for people with motor, sensory, and cognitive impairments. Prereq: grad st; college-level computer course or equiv or cons instr

777 Fieldwork in Assistive Technology. 1-6 cr. G. Provides students with a school-orclinic-based experience in the elivery of assistive technology services. ExcEduc 777 & OccThpy 777 are jointly offfered; they count as repeats of one another. May be retaken for 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st & cons instr

780 Physical Agents in Rehabilitation. 3 cr. G. Application of physical agents to restore functional abilities in a rehabilitation setting; includes review of research literature and competency testing. Prereq: grad st

786 Applied Biostatistics in Ergonomics. 3 cr. G. Statistical methods used in ergonomic studies to analyze, summarize, and report measurements and data. 2 hr lec & 2 hr lab/week. Jointly offered with & counts as repeat of Nurs 786 & Ind Eng 786. Prereq: grad st; Ind Eng 580; a course in statistics or cons instr

787 Issues in Ergonomics: Epidemiology. 1 cr. G. Concepts in epidemiological studies employed to study risk factors in ergonomic research. Design considerations, strengths and weaknesses of different types of studies. Jointly offered with & counts as repeat of Nurs 787 & Ind Eng 787. Prereq: grad st; Ind Eng 580; a course in statistics or cons instr

788 Legal Issues and Regulatory Agencies in Ergonomics. 1 cr. G. Understanding of ergonomic regulations, regulatory sets, and agencies' and workers' compensations laws. Jointly offered with & counts as repeat of Nurs 788 & Ind Eng 788. Prereq: grad st; Ind Eng 580(P); a course in statistics or cons instr

790 Design Project. 2-3 cr. G. Integration and application of concepts learned in other ergonomic courses to analyze and abate ergonomic hazards in a scientific manner. Jointly offered with & counts as repeat of Nurs 790 & Ind Eng 790. Prereq: grad st; Ind Eng 780(P), 783(P), 786(P), 788(P) or cons instr

880 (890) Master's Project. 1-6 cr. G. Preparation of an individual project under the supervision of the student's major advisor. Prereq: grad st; cons advisor.

900 Teaching, Learning and Educational Leadership in the Health Sciences. 3 cr. G. Overview of higher education in the health sciences and the responsibilities of the professoriate in fulfilling the missions of research, teaching, and service. Prereq: grad st.

990 Research and Thesis. 1-6 cr. G. Production of a thesis under the supervision of the student's major professor with the consultation of the degree committee. Prereq: grad st; cons advisor.

999 Advanced Independent Study. 1-3 cr. G. Supervised investigation of particular topic area either not covered by other occupational therapy courses or at a level of sopistication beyond that in a course. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.

Page last updated on: 12/18/2014