UWM Home PageUWM Graduate School UWM logo Grad School graphic
Quick Links


Prospective Students


Contact Information

Phone: (414) 229-5565
Fax: (414) 229-5530
E-mail: chemdept@uwm.edu

Request Information

Chemistry

School/College: College of Letters and Science

Degrees Conferred:

  • M.S. in Chemistry
  • Ph.D. in Chemistry

Contents

Overview

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers a graduate program of studies with a choice of areas of specialization in analytical, organic, inorganic and physical chemistry or in biochemistry. The student is expected to develop breadth of study beyond the boundaries of traditional areas and disciplines. The student is afforded the opportunity of interdisciplinary study in the Surface Studies Laboratory and in the Center for Great Lakes Studies.

Graduate Faculty

Go back to the top

Distinguished Professors
Aita, Carolyn, Ph.D., Northwestern University
Cook, James M., Ph.D., University of Michigan
Petering, David H., Ph.D., University of Michigan
Tysoe, Wilfred T., Ph.D., University of Cambridge, England
Professors
Bennett, Dennis, Ph.D., University of Utah
Dietz, Mark, Ph.D., University of Arizona
Geissinger, Peter, Ph.D., University of Bayreuth, Germany, Chair
Moran, Graham, Ph.D. University of Michigan
Associate Professors
Aldstadt, Joseph H., Ph.D., Ohio University
Chen, Jian, Ph.D., Fudan University, PR China
Frick, David, Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University
Hossain, M. Mahmun, Ph.D., University of South Carolina
Indig, Guilherme, Ph.D., University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Pacheco, Andrew, Ph.D., University of British Columbia
Schwabacher, Alan, Ph.D., Columbia University
Surerus, Kristene K., Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Woehl, Jörg, Ph.D., University of California - Riverside
Assistant Professors
Arnold, Alexander, Ph.D., University of Groningen, Netherlands
Blecking, Anja, Ph.D., University of Duisburg, Germany
Murphy, Kristen L., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Peng, Xiaohua, Ph.D., University of Osnabrueck, Germany
Silvaggi, Nicholas R., Ph.D., University of Connecticut

Master of Science in Chemistry

Go back to the top

Admission

An applicant must meet Graduate School requirements plus this departmental requirement to be considered for admission to the program

  1. Undergraduate preparation in chemistry and related areas equivalent to a chemistry major which includes at least one year each of physical and organic chemistry with laboratories, and one course each in analytical and inorganic chemistry with physical chemistry prerequisite.
  2. Submission of scores from the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The Chemistry Subject Test is strongly recommended.

Applicants may be admitted with specific program-defined course deficiencies provided that the deficiencies amount to no more than two courses. The student is expected to satisfy deficiency requirements within three enrolled semesters. The deficiencies are monitored by the Graduate School and the individual graduate program unit. No course credits earned in making up deficiencies may be counted as program credits required for the degree. See Special Non-Thesis Option below for additional requirements for admission to that option.

Standard Thesis Option
Major Professor as Advisor

The student must have a major professor to advise and supervise the student's studies as specified in Graduate School regulations. The entering student is assigned a temporary advisor; a permanent advisor must be selected by the end of the first semester of study. The major professor serves as the student's research mentor.

Standard Thesis Option Credits and Courses requirements are changing.

Currently enrolled students have the option of following the old or new requirements. Students entering in Fall 2014 or later must complete the new requirements.

Credits and Courses

Minimum degree requirement is 24 graduate credits. Normally these include at least five 600-899 level courses, chosen by the student in consultation with the advisor. A minimum grade point average of 3.00 must be earned in formal coursework, not including research courses (990-996) or seminars (912, 931-935). The remaining credits are taken in research and seminars. The student must take Chemistry 900 (Chemistry Colloquium) and take or audit Chemistry 912 (Graduate Seminar) each semester in residence. This requirement may be modified for part-time students who may be employed during normal hours of the seminar and colloquium. Graduate School regulations require that a majority of all courses taken be at the 700-999 level. Prior to initial registration, the student takes advisory examinations to assess that individual's preparation in analytical, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry; in consultation with the major professor, the student plans a program based on the results of these examinations. The student must also participate in at least one term of part-time teaching as a teaching assistant.

Thesis

The student writes a thesis, essentially a formal report of that student's research. Since the M.S. is largely a research degree, the quality of research reported in the thesis is an important measure of the student's success in the program.

Comprehensive Examination

The student must pass a final oral examination in defense of the thesis. At the discretion of the examining committee, this examination may include topics in addition to the thesis.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within five years of initial enrollment.

Special Non-Thesis Option For Students With Professional Experience In Chemistry
Admission

In addition to the general requirements noted above for the master's degree program, applicants must have a minimum of five years of professional chemistry experience beyond the B.A. or B.S. degree, including a sizable amount of research or development laboratory work. Since the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry believes that the problem-solving experience of research is an indispensable part of graduate study, applicants will be interviewed by a faculty committee to assess the prior research experience as appropriate background for the program.

Major Professor as Advisor

The student must have a major professor to advise and supervise the student's studies as specified in Graduate School regulations. For this option, the major professor is chosen (by the Graduate Subcommittee) before admission to the program, and serves as a member of the committee which assesses the prior research experience of the student. The major professor should be from the area of chemistry in which the student intends to concentrate the major portion of course efforts.

Credits and Courses

Minimum degree requirement is 24 graduate credits, including no more than two credits of seminar. The remaining credits should be in formal courses. Registration for Graduate Seminar and Chemistry Colloquium, advisory examinations, course program, and core courses shall follow requirements for full- or part-time graduate students, as described for the Standard Thesis Option.

Papers and Comprehensive Examinations

The student prepares two survey papers exploring subjects in more depth than the coverage in coursework. Of these, one is in a major area and one is in a minor area. These must be approved by the student's examining committee, which consists of three faculty members representing the areas of the papers. One paper must be approved at least six months before the comprehensive examination. An oral comprehensive examination covers both the areas of the papers and other areas at the discretion of the committee.

Time Limit

The student must complete all degree requirements within five years of initial enrollment.

Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry

Go back to the top

Admission

An applicant must meet Graduate School requirements plus departmental requirements as given for admission to the master's program. A master's degree is not a prerequisite for admission to the Ph.D. program in chemistry.

Reapplication

A student who receives the master's degree must formally reapply for admission to the Graduate School before continuing studies toward the Ph.D. Major

Professor as Advisor

The student must have a major professor to advise and supervise the student's studies as specified in Graduate School regulations. The entering student is assigned a temporary advisor; a permanent advisor must be selected by the end of the first semester of study. The major professor serves as the student's research mentor.

Course of Study

Minimum degree requirement is 54 graduate credits beyond the bachelor's degree, at least 27 of which must be earned in residence at UWM. The student plans an individual program of studies in consultation with the major professor. Coursework must include one of the following: a minor of 9 to 12 credits in a single department; a minor of 9 to 12 credits in two or more departments; a coherent program of at least 9 credits concentrated in an area of chemistry outside the student's principal area of emphasis. A Program of Studies, including coursework and proposed research, must be approved by the Department. A minimum grade point average of 3.00 must be earned in coursework in Chemistry, not including research (900-996) or seminars (912-935). Graduate School regulations require that a majority of all courses taken be at the 700-999 level. The Department has no formal language requirement but the student is responsible for familiarity with published literature in the area of that student's research. The student must also participate in at least one semester of part-time teaching as a teaching assistant. The first stage of the student's program includes general preparation as in the master's program, as well as specialized courses in principal areas of interest and the initiation of research. Admission to the second stage of the Ph.D. program is based upon satisfactory performance in courses, research, and in departmental examinations. Upon entrance, the student takes proficiency examinations in analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. Departmental approval to continue in the doctoral program is attained by passing an advanced qualifying examination in the major area. This examination must be completed by the end of the fourth semester of study. In the second stage of the program, the student concentrates on the development and execution of original research. Additional coursework may also be required to complete the program of studies.

Residence

The student must meet minimum Graduate School residence requirements.

Doctoral Preliminary Examination

The student must take a doctoral preliminary examination. This serves to qualify the student for formal admission by the Graduate School to candidacy for the degree.

Dissertation

Candidates must each present a dissertation reporting the results of independent, original research carried out under the direction of their major professor. At least three months before the Dissertation Defense, at a time when most of the experimental work has been completed, the student meets with the Examining Committee for a preliminary review of the research to be described in the dissertation.

Dissertation Defense

The candidate must, as the final step toward the degree, defend the dissertation in an oral examination. The candidate also presents a public dissertation seminar, describing research in completed form for the Department and others who may be interested. A student who does not pass this examination within five years of admission to candidacy may be required to take another preliminary examination and be readmitted to candidacy.

Time Limit

All degree requirements must be completed within 10 years from the date of initial enrollment in the doctoral program. For additional information view the Graduate School Ph.D. requirements.

Courses

Go back to the top

Courses numbered 300-699 are Undergraduate/Graduate. Courses numbered 700 and above are Graduate only.

497 Study Abroad: (Subtitled). 1-12 cr. U/G.
Designed to enroll students in UWM sponsored program before course work level, content and credits are determined and/or in specially prepared program course work. Retakable w/chg in topic. Prereq: jr st; acceptance for Study Abroad Prog.
501 Introduction to Biochemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
The chemistry of biological systems. Does not count toward graduate degree in chemistry. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 341(P) or 345(P).
502 Development of Modern Chemistry. 2 cr. U/G.
Traces the development of chemistry from ancient to modern times. Prereq: jr st; a grade of C or better in Chem 221(P) or 223(P), & Chem 341(P) or 343(P).
511 Inorganic Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
Introduction to theoretical principles and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Does not count toward graduate degree in Chemistry. Prereq: jr st & grade of C or better in Chem 562(P); or grad st.
524 Instrumental Analysis. 3 cr. U/G.
Chemical equilibria, separations, and theory and practice of instrumental measurements. Does not count toward a graduate degree in chemistry. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 221(P) or 223(P).
560 (effective 05/19/2014) Biophysical Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
General course designed for majors in fields other than chemistry. Does not count toward a graduate degree in chemistry. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 104(P); Math 211(P) or equiv.
560 Biophysical Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
General course designed for majors in fields other than chemistry. Does not count toward a graduate degree in chemistry. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 104(P); Math 211(P) or equiv.
561 Physical Chemistry I. 3 cr. U/G.
Primary focus on chemical thermodynamics. Does not count toward a graduate degree in chemistry. Prereq: jr st; grades of C or better in Chem 104(P), Physics 210(P) & 215(P), & Math 233(P); ElecEng 234(R) or Math 234(R).
562 Physical Chemistry II. 3 cr. U/G.
Continuation of Chem 561; course content is largely kinetics, statistical mechanics, and quantum chemistry. Does not count toward a graduate degree in chemistry. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 561(P).
563 Physical Chemistry Laboratory. 1-2 cr. U/G.
Carries grad cr for students other than chem students. Prereq: jr st & grade of C or better in Chem 221(P) or 223(P) & Chem 561(P).
599 Special Projects in Chemistry. 3-5 cr. U/G.
Directed study or research on subjects selected by the instructor. For further information consult dept chair. Retakable to 7 cr max. Does not count toward a graduate degree in chemistry. Prereq: jr st; cons instr.
601 Biochemistry: Protein Structure and Function. 3 cr. U/G.
Cellular synthesis of proteins, protein structure/function, enzyme mechanisms. Prereq: jr st; grades of C or better in Chem 345(P), 501(P), & either 560(C) or 562(C).
602 Biochemistry: Cellular Processes. 3 cr. U/G.
Biosynthesis and metabolism of nucleic acids, structure and replication of DNA, control of gene expression, signal transduction. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 501(P) or cons instr.
603 Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory. 2 cr. U/G.
Experiments in biological preparations, colorimetry, chromatography, and radioisotope techniques. Prereq: jr st; grades of C or better in Chem 221(P) or 223(P) & in Chem 501(P).
603 (effective 05/19/2014) Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory. 2 cr. U/G.
Experiments in biological preparations, colorimetry, chromatography, and radioisotope techniques. Prereq: jr st; grades of C or better in Chem 221(P) or 223(P) & in Chem 501(P).
604 Biochemistry: Metabolism. 3 cr. U/G.
Glycolysis, photosynthesis, biosynthesis, metabolism. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 501(P) or cons instr.
611 Physical Inorganic Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
Physical and theoretical aspects of inorganic chemistry (spectroscopy, crystallography, kinetic and theoretical methods) are discussed. Prereq: Chem 511(P) or cons instr.
612 Transition Metal and Organometallic Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
Advanced survey of elements, emphasizing transition elements and organometallic species. Main group organometallics and actinides and lanthanides briefly discussed. Prereq: Chem 511(P) or cons instr.
613 Main Group Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
Advanced survey of metallic and non-metallic main group elements. Prereq: jr st & grade of C or better in Chem 511(P); or grad st.
614 Bio-Inorganic Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
Inorganic chemistry for biological systems; metaloproteins; coordination chemistry in enzymes. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 511(P).
630 Computational Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
Computer modeling techniques for molecular systems. Prereq: jr st; grade of C or better in Chem 562(P) or cons instr.
640 Advanced Survey of Organic Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
Prereq: jr st; a grade of C or better in Chem 345(P).
647 Physical Methods of Organic Chemistry. 3 cr. U/G.
Application of modern instrumental methods to the separation, analysis, and identification of organic compounds. Prereq: jr st, a grade of C or better in Chem 345(P), 346(P), 524(P).
661 Intermediate Chemical Thermodynamics. 3 cr. U/G.
Laws of thermodynamics equilibria between phases. Introductory statistical thermodynamics. Thermodynamic properties of gases, solids, and solutions. Prereq: sr st, a grade of C or better in Chem 562(P).
662 Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics. 3 cr. U/G.
Present understanding of reaction kinetics and dynamics. Topics range from experimental methods for kinetics measurements to microscopic theories of reaction rates. Prereq: sr st; grade of C or better in Chem 562(P).
701 Topics in Biochemistry: (Subtitled). 2-4 cr. G.
Selected topics in biochemistry. Two topics, each for 2 cr, will last 1/2 of the semester. Students may enroll in either (2 cr) or both (4 cr). The 3 cr option offers a more complete coverage of a single topic for a full semester. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st; grade of C or better in Chem 501(P) or 601(P).
710 Advanced Survey of Inorganic Chemistry. 3 cr. G.
Graduate-level treatment of theoretical principles and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Prereq: grad st.
711 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Selected topics of current research interest in inorganic chemistry are discussed in detail. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
724 Electrochemistry. 3 cr. G.
Surey of modern electrochemical theory and applications to measurement of solution concentrations, rate constants, thermodynamic quantities, transport properties, and adsorption phenomena. Prereq: grad st; grade of C or better in Chem 524(P) or 621(P).
726 Topics in Analytical Chemistry: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
Selected topics which reflect current advances in analytical chemistry. May be retaken with change in topic to max of 9 cr. Prereq: grad st.
740 Advanced Organic Chemistry-Methods in Synthetic Chemistry. 3 cr. G.
Discussion of name reactions and other synthetic methods of preparative significance used in organic syntheses. Introduction and modification of functional groups. Recent examples of application from modern organic chemistry. Prereq: grad st; a grade of C or better in Chem 345(P).
741 Topics in Organic Chemistry: (Subtitled). 2-3 cr. G.
Current topics in organic chemistry, e.g., organometallic compounds, bioorganic chemistry, non-covalent interactions, reaction mechanisms, alkaloid total synthesis or photochemistry. Offered w/1 topic (3cr), w/2 (2cr ea); if two, take one or both. Retakable w/chg in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st; grade of C or better in Chem 345(P).
748 Physical Organic Chemistry. 3 cr. G.
Application of kinetics and other physical principles to the determination of reaction mechanisms. Prereq: grad st; a grade of C or better in Chem 562(P) & 640(P).
762 Topics in Physical Chemistry: (Subtitled). 3 cr. G.
In-depth discussion of selected topics of current interest in modern physical chemistry. Retakeable with change in topic to 9 cr max. Prereq: grad st.
765 Statistical Thermodynamics. 3 cr. G.
Fundamental principles of statistical mechanics, with applications to topics of physiochemical interest. Prereq: grad st; grade of C or better in Chem 661(P).
767 Basic Quantum Chemistry. 3 cr. G.
Basic postulates of quantum mechanics and consequences. Exact solutions for simple systems. Approximation methods for complex systems. Group theory and applications in organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry. Prereq: grad st; a grade of C or better in Chem 562(P), 564(P), & Math 234(P).
769 Surface Chemistry II. 3 cr. G.
Discussion of kinetic methods of studying reaction mechanisms with particular emphasis on catalytic reactions. Prereq: grad st; grade of C or better in Chem 768(P).
780 Modern Industrial Organic Chemistry. 3 cr. G.
Organic chemical processes-comprehensive emphasis on chemistry, polymers (preparation, properties, application), energy aspects, raw material supplies, impact on nation's and world's economics. Recommended for minor in polymer chem. Prereq: grad st.
781 Pulsed NMR Spectroscopy Theory and Practice. 3 cr. G.
Discussion and hands on practice of modern FT NMR approaches applied to analysis of chemical structure and dynamics in organic, inorganic, and biochemical molecules. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
782 (effective 05/19/2014) Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Fundamentals and Applications. 3 cr. G.
Discussion and hands on practice of modern mass spectrometry, with a focus on liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and LC/tandem MS (LC/MS/MS), as well as ICP-MS. Prereq: grad st; cons instr.
798 Scientific Glassblowing. 1 cr. G.
Techniques in design and maintenance of scientific glassware including low pressure systems together with consideration of the chemical structure and properties of common glasses. Prereq: grad st.
900 Chemistry Colloquium. 0 cr. G.
Weekly lectures on current research by members of the department and visiting scientists. Fee assessed for 1 cr. Required of all Chem grad students. Prereq: grad st.
912 Graduate Seminar. 1 cr. G.
Research problems in chemistry. Weekly papers and reports. Required of all candidates for advanced degree. Prereq: grad st.
931 Advanced Seminar in Analytical Chemistry. 1 cr. G.
Weekly discussions and reports on recent developments and current progress in analytical chemistry. Topics will differ each semester, reflecting current work of particular interest. Retakable to 9 cr max. No more than 9 cr may be accumulated in courses numbered 931-935. Prereq: grad st & enroll in Chem 993(C).
932 Advanced Seminar in Biochemistry. 1 cr. G.
Weekly discussions and reports on recent developments and current progress in biochemistry. Topics will differ each semester, reflecting current work of particular interest. Retakable to 9 cr max. No more than 9 cr may be accumulated in courses numbered 931-935. Prereq: grad st & enroll in Chem 996(C).
933 Advanced Seminar in Inorganic Chemistry. 1 cr. G.
Weekly discussions and reports on recent developments and current progress in inorganic chemistry. Topics will differ each semester, reflecting current work of particular interest. Retakable to 9 cr max. No more than 9 cr may be accumulated in courses numbered 931-935. Prereq: grad st & enroll in Chem 994(C).
934 Advanced Seminar in Organic Chemistry. 1 cr. G.
Weekly discussions and reports on recent developments and current progress in organic chemistry. Topics will differ each semester, reflecting current work of particular interest. Retakable to 9 cr max. No more than 9 cr may be accumulated in courses numbered 931-935. Prereq: grad st & enroll in Chem 990(C).
935 Advanced Seminar in Physical Chemistry. 1 cr. G.
Weekly discussions and reports on recent developments and current progress in physical chemistry. Topics will differ each semester, reflecting current work of particular interest. Retakable to 9 cr max. No more than 9 cr may be accumulated in courses numbered 931-935. Prereq: grad st & enroll in Chem 992.
990 Research: Organic. 1-9 cr. G.
Retakable. Prereq: grad st.
992 Research: Physical. 1-9 cr. G.
Retakable. Prereq: grad st.
993 Research: Analytical. 1-9 cr. G.
Retakable. Prereq: grad st.
994 Research: Inorganic. 1-9 cr. G.
Retakable. Prereq: grad st.
996 Research: Biochemical. 1-9 cr. G.
Retakable. Prereq: grad st.

Page last updated on: 01/29/2014